Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Li in the Analects : Training in Moral Competence and the Question of Flexibility

Li in the Analects : Training in Moral Competence and the Question of Flexibility School of Philosophy, University of New South Wales The concept of li and its role within the Confucian tradition remains a topic of debate and inquiry among contemporary scholars. This is largely due to the prominence of the concept for those attempting to understand and interpret the tradition and, more importantly, for those who seek to establish its contemporary significance.1 The account I propose involves a novel reading of the Confucian concept of li in the Analects. In this account, I track the various meanings of li through three stages of moral cultivation, culminating in the acquisition of moral competence which is marked by an attitude of equanimity (Analects 9 : 29). In the three stages of moral development that I describe, li have different roles and exhibit different degrees of flexibility. The first is the novice's stage during which li are essential in inculcating correct forms of behavior. At this stage, adherence to the dictates of li introduces the learner to the appropriate proprieties in different contexts. The second stage is an experimental one during which the learner extracts principles from these behavioral forms through constant practice. The emphasis at this stage is on the learner testing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Li in the Analects : Training in Moral Competence and the Question of Flexibility

Philosophy East and West , Volume 56 (1) – Mar 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/li-in-the-analects-training-in-moral-competence-and-the-question-of-wCoa0jDLVJ
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

School of Philosophy, University of New South Wales The concept of li and its role within the Confucian tradition remains a topic of debate and inquiry among contemporary scholars. This is largely due to the prominence of the concept for those attempting to understand and interpret the tradition and, more importantly, for those who seek to establish its contemporary significance.1 The account I propose involves a novel reading of the Confucian concept of li in the Analects. In this account, I track the various meanings of li through three stages of moral cultivation, culminating in the acquisition of moral competence which is marked by an attitude of equanimity (Analects 9 : 29). In the three stages of moral development that I describe, li have different roles and exhibit different degrees of flexibility. The first is the novice's stage during which li are essential in inculcating correct forms of behavior. At this stage, adherence to the dictates of li introduces the learner to the appropriate proprieties in different contexts. The second stage is an experimental one during which the learner extracts principles from these behavioral forms through constant practice. The emphasis at this stage is on the learner testing

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2006

There are no references for this article.