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Legendary Hawai‘i and the Politics of Place: Tradition, Translation, and Tourism (review)

Legendary Hawai‘i and the Politics of Place: Tradition, Translation, and Tourism (review) Book and Media Reviews the contemporary pacific 23:2 (2011) After 1898, when Hawai`i became a territory of the United States, the production of legendary Hawai`i intensified. Taking advantage of new printing technologies, publishers illustrated stories with attractive photographic reproductions of scenery and people, which helped market Hawai`i as an elite travel destination. This pairing of text and imagery, often published tee (established in 1903), contributed to the creation of a new colonial imaginary with far-reaching consequences. As the production of translated stories increased, settlers began to see themselves as the experts on Native life while Hawaiians became the informants. This erosion of Native authority paralleled the displacement of Native Hawaiians from the land-- an issue that remains pertinent to contentious discussions over Hawaiian sovereignty initiatives and land claims today. Although the stories of legendary Hawai`i were not written exclusively by or for non-Hawaiians, they served "primarily non-Hawaiian interests at a crucial political juncture" (6). They thus reinforced the ideological beliefs of settlers who supported the 1898 annexation of Hawai`i, the pivotal moment when Hawai`i became a colony of the United States (or an occupied nation, according to a number of Hawaiian scholars). Bacchilega's project joins those of other http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Legendary Hawai‘i and the Politics of Place: Tradition, Translation, and Tourism (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 23 (2) – Aug 20, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-9464
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Abstract

Book and Media Reviews the contemporary pacific 23:2 (2011) After 1898, when Hawai`i became a territory of the United States, the production of legendary Hawai`i intensified. Taking advantage of new printing technologies, publishers illustrated stories with attractive photographic reproductions of scenery and people, which helped market Hawai`i as an elite travel destination. This pairing of text and imagery, often published tee (established in 1903), contributed to the creation of a new colonial imaginary with far-reaching consequences. As the production of translated stories increased, settlers began to see themselves as the experts on Native life while Hawaiians became the informants. This erosion of Native authority paralleled the displacement of Native Hawaiians from the land-- an issue that remains pertinent to contentious discussions over Hawaiian sovereignty initiatives and land claims today. Although the stories of legendary Hawai`i were not written exclusively by or for non-Hawaiians, they served "primarily non-Hawaiian interests at a crucial political juncture" (6). They thus reinforced the ideological beliefs of settlers who supported the 1898 annexation of Hawai`i, the pivotal moment when Hawai`i became a colony of the United States (or an occupied nation, according to a number of Hawaiian scholars). Bacchilega's project joins those of other

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 20, 2011

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