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La pensee Chinoise et l'abstraction (review)

La pensee Chinoise et l'abstraction (review) BOOK REVIEWS   La pensee Chinoise et l'abstraction. By Anna Ghiglione. Paris: Editions You-Feng, 1999. Pp. 303. Reviewed by Mary Tiles University of Hawai`i  In La pensee Chinoise et l'abstraction Anna Ghiglione deploys the methods of analytic philosophy of language to exhibit the many and various means used by ancient (pre-Qin) Chinese philosophers to express abstract ideas. This is done in order to make the larger point that characteristics of a language, whether Chinese, Greek, Latin, French, or English, do not on their own explain differences in philosophical style or the presence or absence of particular kinds of philosophical theorizing. The stalking horse here is the Western sinological tradition, which, from its very beginnings in the seventeenth century, has been shaped by the views of those such as Athanasius Kircher, who denounced the inadequate means afforded by Chinese characters for expressing matters sacred. Even in the twentieth century, Ghiglione suggests, Chinese studies has been informed by a collective representation that portrays Chinese language and thought as deficient by comparison with Western languages and systems of philosophy, because the former lacks vehicles for the expression of abstract ideas. The other large issue in the background here is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

La pensee Chinoise et l'abstraction (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 51 (4) – Jan 10, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1529-1898
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS   La pensee Chinoise et l'abstraction. By Anna Ghiglione. Paris: Editions You-Feng, 1999. Pp. 303. Reviewed by Mary Tiles University of Hawai`i  In La pensee Chinoise et l'abstraction Anna Ghiglione deploys the methods of analytic philosophy of language to exhibit the many and various means used by ancient (pre-Qin) Chinese philosophers to express abstract ideas. This is done in order to make the larger point that characteristics of a language, whether Chinese, Greek, Latin, French, or English, do not on their own explain differences in philosophical style or the presence or absence of particular kinds of philosophical theorizing. The stalking horse here is the Western sinological tradition, which, from its very beginnings in the seventeenth century, has been shaped by the views of those such as Athanasius Kircher, who denounced the inadequate means afforded by Chinese characters for expressing matters sacred. Even in the twentieth century, Ghiglione suggests, Chinese studies has been informed by a collective representation that portrays Chinese language and thought as deficient by comparison with Western languages and systems of philosophy, because the former lacks vehicles for the expression of abstract ideas. The other large issue in the background here is

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 10, 2001

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