Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

La Méditerranée asiatique: Villes portuaires et réseaux marchands en Chine, au Japon et en Asie du Sud-est, XVIe–XXIe siècle (review)

La Méditerranée asiatique: Villes portuaires et réseaux marchands en Chine, au Japon et en Asie... journal of world history, june 2011 the Ergas and Silvera partnership after it entered into a somewhat too open-ended partnership with a Persian merchant to sell in Europe a diamond of about sixty carats. As Thomas Pitt had found decades earlier, the trouble with big diamonds was that there were so few potential buyers. The tale of woe winds on from 1740 to 1749 and ends with a sale devoid of profit. Ergas and Silvera were saved from complete ruin by a singularity of Jewish marriage and property law; women received large amounts of payment from both families upon marriage and had full control of these "dowry" funds, and in any bankruptcy proceeding preservation of these funds took precedence over payment to commercial creditors. The Ergas and Silvera families were much less wealthy after this debacle but managed to shield enough of their funds in this way to avoid total disaster. Trivellato thanks a number of people named Ergas and Silvera for their reminiscences about their family history; the global and the local or familial, the macro and the micro, remain marvelously intertwined. john e. wills jr. University of Southern California, Emeritus La Méditerranée asiatique: Villes portuaires et http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

La Méditerranée asiatique: Villes portuaires et réseaux marchands en Chine, au Japon et en Asie du Sud-est, XVIe–XXIe siècle (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 22 (2) – Aug 3, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/la-m-diterran-e-asiatique-villes-portuaires-et-r-seaux-marchands-en-UYijtPfLqY
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

journal of world history, june 2011 the Ergas and Silvera partnership after it entered into a somewhat too open-ended partnership with a Persian merchant to sell in Europe a diamond of about sixty carats. As Thomas Pitt had found decades earlier, the trouble with big diamonds was that there were so few potential buyers. The tale of woe winds on from 1740 to 1749 and ends with a sale devoid of profit. Ergas and Silvera were saved from complete ruin by a singularity of Jewish marriage and property law; women received large amounts of payment from both families upon marriage and had full control of these "dowry" funds, and in any bankruptcy proceeding preservation of these funds took precedence over payment to commercial creditors. The Ergas and Silvera families were much less wealthy after this debacle but managed to shield enough of their funds in this way to avoid total disaster. Trivellato thanks a number of people named Ergas and Silvera for their reminiscences about their family history; the global and the local or familial, the macro and the micro, remain marvelously intertwined. john e. wills jr. University of Southern California, Emeritus La Méditerranée asiatique: Villes portuaires et

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 3, 2011

There are no references for this article.