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La Fête-spectacle: Théâtre et rite au Nepal (review)

La Fête-spectacle: Théâtre et rite au Nepal (review) 576 Book Reviews ter, though it is nowadays promoted as ‘Korean traditional opera’” (pp. 173– 174). Killick provides analysis on the four classic p’ansori stories and shows how the stories are concerned with the theme of foreign penetration and resis- tance at the bodily and/or national level. He suggests this theme extends its treatment in a number of newly composed ch’anggŭk operas. For Killick, the “national” status of ch’anggŭk encourages a reading that resists penetration at both the bodily and national levels (p. 175). Killick’s conclusion addresses the globalization of Korean traditional art and suggests that ch’anggŭk will be better received overseas “by evoking a traditional quality in the acting and stagecraft as much as in the music and texts that are performed” (p. 218). Though insightful, In Search of Korean Traditional Opera does not give close explanation of the genderedness of ch’anggŭk, especially on the issue of cross-gender acting in yŏsŏng kukkŭk. Nor does Killick analyze the performance space or the “choreography.” Were the corporeal gestures and movement of the performers rehearsed beforehand, or was there room for improvisation? That said, Killick provides a useful reexamination of ch’anggŭk, espe- cially in his account of “looking at different phases http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

La Fête-spectacle: Théâtre et rite au Nepal (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 29 (2) – Feb 14, 2013

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

576 Book Reviews ter, though it is nowadays promoted as ‘Korean traditional opera’” (pp. 173– 174). Killick provides analysis on the four classic p’ansori stories and shows how the stories are concerned with the theme of foreign penetration and resis- tance at the bodily and/or national level. He suggests this theme extends its treatment in a number of newly composed ch’anggŭk operas. For Killick, the “national” status of ch’anggŭk encourages a reading that resists penetration at both the bodily and national levels (p. 175). Killick’s conclusion addresses the globalization of Korean traditional art and suggests that ch’anggŭk will be better received overseas “by evoking a traditional quality in the acting and stagecraft as much as in the music and texts that are performed” (p. 218). Though insightful, In Search of Korean Traditional Opera does not give close explanation of the genderedness of ch’anggŭk, especially on the issue of cross-gender acting in yŏsŏng kukkŭk. Nor does Killick analyze the performance space or the “choreography.” Were the corporeal gestures and movement of the performers rehearsed beforehand, or was there room for improvisation? That said, Killick provides a useful reexamination of ch’anggŭk, espe- cially in his account of “looking at different phases

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 14, 2013

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