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Kwamra: A Season of Harvest, and: Captain Cook in the Underworld (review)

Kwamra: A Season of Harvest, and: Captain Cook in the Underworld (review) lish, Pidgin, and Anuki references, the collection is a model of what readers can increasingly look forward to in Pacific poetry. The introduction is a clear and considered declaration of artistic independence: "What we are really doing for the first time is attempting to best express ourselves in our own language through a certain medium of human communication known as the English language. We are no longer merely borrowing the language. Rather, we are transcending both in order to find ourselves actually living the pulse and beat of our languages within the flesh of the English language itself" (ix). Each poem carries the cultural harvest of the poet's social experience, exploring existentially and experimentally form, language, and point of view. The opening poem, "Return of St Nativeson," refers to Soaba's influential novel Wanpis (1977)--the title word translated here as "(i) one piece: one who professes self-hood, commitment and social responsibility in his style of living; (ii) an existentialist in Soaba's writings"(59)--which traces the development of artistic identity through a number of characters. Tension, too, is developed in this poetry collection around the conflict between lusman (a loser [58]; also an existentialist) and wanpis, in which artistic production requires http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Kwamra: A Season of Harvest, and: Captain Cook in the Underworld (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 17 (1) – Jan 27, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

lish, Pidgin, and Anuki references, the collection is a model of what readers can increasingly look forward to in Pacific poetry. The introduction is a clear and considered declaration of artistic independence: "What we are really doing for the first time is attempting to best express ourselves in our own language through a certain medium of human communication known as the English language. We are no longer merely borrowing the language. Rather, we are transcending both in order to find ourselves actually living the pulse and beat of our languages within the flesh of the English language itself" (ix). Each poem carries the cultural harvest of the poet's social experience, exploring existentially and experimentally form, language, and point of view. The opening poem, "Return of St Nativeson," refers to Soaba's influential novel Wanpis (1977)--the title word translated here as "(i) one piece: one who professes self-hood, commitment and social responsibility in his style of living; (ii) an existentialist in Soaba's writings"(59)--which traces the development of artistic identity through a number of characters. Tension, too, is developed in this poetry collection around the conflict between lusman (a loser [58]; also an existentialist) and wanpis, in which artistic production requires

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 27, 2005

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