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Korean Trojan Women: Performing Wartime Sexual Violence

Korean Trojan Women: Performing Wartime Sexual Violence <p>Abstract:</p><p>Aida Karic’s <i>The Trojan Women: An Asian Story</i> (2007), an international collaboration between a Bosnian-born director and a Korean choreographer, a Korean composer, and a Korean theatre company, was first produced at the Schauspielhaus Wien in Austria and then toured to the United States and South Korea. Karic’s <i>The Trojan Women</i> interweaves the history of Japanese military sexual slavery, particularly of Korean survivors, with Euripides’s <i>The Trojan Women</i>. It relies on identifiable markers of Koreanness, such as the musical style of <i>pansori</i> and the visual imagery of shamanic ritual movement, to locate the narrative as a Korean tragedy. I argue that the re-visioning of these Korean cultural forms, such as the use of cloth in the ritual scene, offers a symbolic reclamation of violated bodies while providing a redressive space for the audience to witness the long history of wartime sexual violence against women.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Korean Trojan Women: Performing Wartime Sexual Violence

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 33 (2) – Aug 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Aida Karic’s <i>The Trojan Women: An Asian Story</i> (2007), an international collaboration between a Bosnian-born director and a Korean choreographer, a Korean composer, and a Korean theatre company, was first produced at the Schauspielhaus Wien in Austria and then toured to the United States and South Korea. Karic’s <i>The Trojan Women</i> interweaves the history of Japanese military sexual slavery, particularly of Korean survivors, with Euripides’s <i>The Trojan Women</i>. It relies on identifiable markers of Koreanness, such as the musical style of <i>pansori</i> and the visual imagery of shamanic ritual movement, to locate the narrative as a Korean tragedy. I argue that the re-visioning of these Korean cultural forms, such as the use of cloth in the ritual scene, offers a symbolic reclamation of violated bodies while providing a redressive space for the audience to witness the long history of wartime sexual violence against women.</p>

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 9, 2016

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