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Korean Shamans in the Present Tense: Introduction

Korean Shamans in the Present Tense: Introduction Korean Shamans in the Present Tense Introduction I agreed to comment on the three contributions to this symposium in a desire to see how the study of shamans in contemporary Korea is developing. I was curious about how and in what ways it continues to attract the attention of young scholars like Dong-kyu Kim and Jun Hwan Park, as well as offering new questions to veterans of Korean shaman studies like Jongsung Yang. As these contributions abundantly demonstrate, and as many of us have argued for a long time, there is no such thing as a fixed ‘‘Korean shamanism’’, but rather a body of religious practices that survive precisely because they are fluid, responsive to other changes in Korean society. Like quicksilver contemporary South Korea, and the shamans who share in its dynamism, scholarship too is a moving target, with new projects and new approaches continuously added to the conversation. At the same time, all of these works build upon some viable scholarship that has gone before. The idea of transformation, adaptation, and creative adjustment is most explicit in Dong-kyu Kim’s contribution on the ‘‘Reconfiguration of Korean Shamanic Ritual.’’ Kim takes as his bête noir recent works under the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Religions University of Hawai'I Press

Korean Shamans in the Present Tense: Introduction

Journal of Korean Religions , Volume 3 (2) – Nov 23, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, Korea
ISSN
2093-7288
eISSN
2167-2040

Abstract

Korean Shamans in the Present Tense Introduction I agreed to comment on the three contributions to this symposium in a desire to see how the study of shamans in contemporary Korea is developing. I was curious about how and in what ways it continues to attract the attention of young scholars like Dong-kyu Kim and Jun Hwan Park, as well as offering new questions to veterans of Korean shaman studies like Jongsung Yang. As these contributions abundantly demonstrate, and as many of us have argued for a long time, there is no such thing as a fixed ‘‘Korean shamanism’’, but rather a body of religious practices that survive precisely because they are fluid, responsive to other changes in Korean society. Like quicksilver contemporary South Korea, and the shamans who share in its dynamism, scholarship too is a moving target, with new projects and new approaches continuously added to the conversation. At the same time, all of these works build upon some viable scholarship that has gone before. The idea of transformation, adaptation, and creative adjustment is most explicit in Dong-kyu Kim’s contribution on the ‘‘Reconfiguration of Korean Shamanic Ritual.’’ Kim takes as his bête noir recent works under the

Journal

Journal of Korean ReligionsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 23, 2012

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