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Korean Buddhist Nuns and Laywomen: Hidden Histories, Enduring Vitality (review)

Korean Buddhist Nuns and Laywomen: Hidden Histories, Enduring Vitality (review) Book Reviews Korean Buddhist Nuns and Laywomen: Hidden Histories, Enduring Vitality. Edited by Eun-su Cho, Albany: State University of New York Press, 2011, xiii, 210 p. Due to the paucity of written records, it is difficult to attempt historical recon- struction of the lives of Buddhist women in East Asia. Happily, in the last decade, book-length historical studies of female monasticism in China and Japan have appeared, notably Beata Grant’s Eminent Nuns: Women Chan Masters of Seventeenth-Century China (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2008) and Lori Meeks’ Hokkeji and the Reemergence of Female Monastic Orders in Pre- Modern Japan (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2010). Another first book is Elsie DeVido’s short monograph, Taiwan’s Buddhist Nuns (State University of New York Press, 2010), a historical study of contemporary nuns in Taiwan. In this range of studies, Korea is visibly absent from this burgeoning scholar- ship on female monasticism in East Asia. This is particularly odd at a time when nuns constitute half of the ordained population in the largest Korean Buddhist order, the Chogye-jong (p. 35). Two popular publications on Korean nuns have recently appeared (Martine Bachelor, Women in Korean Zen: Lives and Practice, Syracuse University Press, 2006; Daehaeng Sunim, No http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Religions University of Hawai'I Press

Korean Buddhist Nuns and Laywomen: Hidden Histories, Enduring Vitality (review)

Journal of Korean Religions , Volume 3 (2) – Nov 23, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, Korea
ISSN
2093-7288
eISSN
2167-2040

Abstract

Book Reviews Korean Buddhist Nuns and Laywomen: Hidden Histories, Enduring Vitality. Edited by Eun-su Cho, Albany: State University of New York Press, 2011, xiii, 210 p. Due to the paucity of written records, it is difficult to attempt historical recon- struction of the lives of Buddhist women in East Asia. Happily, in the last decade, book-length historical studies of female monasticism in China and Japan have appeared, notably Beata Grant’s Eminent Nuns: Women Chan Masters of Seventeenth-Century China (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2008) and Lori Meeks’ Hokkeji and the Reemergence of Female Monastic Orders in Pre- Modern Japan (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2010). Another first book is Elsie DeVido’s short monograph, Taiwan’s Buddhist Nuns (State University of New York Press, 2010), a historical study of contemporary nuns in Taiwan. In this range of studies, Korea is visibly absent from this burgeoning scholar- ship on female monasticism in East Asia. This is particularly odd at a time when nuns constitute half of the ordained population in the largest Korean Buddhist order, the Chogye-jong (p. 35). Two popular publications on Korean nuns have recently appeared (Martine Bachelor, Women in Korean Zen: Lives and Practice, Syracuse University Press, 2006; Daehaeng Sunim, No

Journal

Journal of Korean ReligionsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 23, 2012

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