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Kohika: The Archaeology of a Late Maori Lake Village in the Ngati Awa Rohe, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand (review)

Kohika: The Archaeology of a Late Maori Lake Village in the Ngati Awa Rohe, Bay of Plenty, New... asian perspectives 45(1) spring 2006 to include social standing, personal choices by di¤erent families, and the animals themselves. The final two chapters provide a discussion of the various interpretive models used by earlier scholars as well as a ``new model'' proposed on the basis of the ethnographic data discussed in chapter 8. This new model is not clearly articulated, but it appears to be a model where crops and animals are both important, though di¤erent species and seasons may be important for di¤erent groups. However, the overlap between these groups at all stages, and between both sedentary groups in the Vale of Peshawar and mobile groups from the Northern Valleys means that distinguishing between the settled and the mobile groups at any given site would be dependent on determining more subtle discriminants than is possible with the current data sets. ( p. 80) It is unfortunate that the author does not provide any examples of how these ``subtle discriminants'' can be identified archaeologically. Another conclusion proposed by the author is that prior to 1400 b.c., the northern valleys were of great significance for trade and had cultural and strategic importance. While there is no question that there was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Kohika: The Archaeology of a Late Maori Lake Village in the Ngati Awa Rohe, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 45 (1) – Mar 27, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
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Abstract

asian perspectives 45(1) spring 2006 to include social standing, personal choices by di¤erent families, and the animals themselves. The final two chapters provide a discussion of the various interpretive models used by earlier scholars as well as a ``new model'' proposed on the basis of the ethnographic data discussed in chapter 8. This new model is not clearly articulated, but it appears to be a model where crops and animals are both important, though di¤erent species and seasons may be important for di¤erent groups. However, the overlap between these groups at all stages, and between both sedentary groups in the Vale of Peshawar and mobile groups from the Northern Valleys means that distinguishing between the settled and the mobile groups at any given site would be dependent on determining more subtle discriminants than is possible with the current data sets. ( p. 80) It is unfortunate that the author does not provide any examples of how these ``subtle discriminants'' can be identified archaeologically. Another conclusion proposed by the author is that prior to 1400 b.c., the northern valleys were of great significance for trade and had cultural and strategic importance. While there is no question that there was

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 27, 2006

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