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Keiji Nishitani and Karl Rahner: A Response to Nihility

Keiji Nishitani and Karl Rahner: A Response to Nihility ARTICLES Heidi Ann Russell Institute of Pastoral Studies at Loyola University Chicago In his essay "Kenosis and Emptiness," Buddhist scholar Masao Abe states that "the necessity of tackling the Buddhist-Christian dialogue not merely in terms of interfaith dialogue, but also as an inseparable part of the wider sociocultural problem of religion versus irreligion has become more and more pressing in the past few decades." 1 From Keiji Nishitani's perspective a culture of self-centeredness has developed out of the inability of many people to move beyond a sense of nihilism in their lives. Furthermore, technological advances and an increased understanding of the laws of nature have allowed humans to manipulate those laws for their own purposes. In this development, Nishitani believes that "the perversion that occurred in the original relationship of man to the laws of nature has taken the shape of a fundamental intertwining of the mechanization of man and his transformation into a subject in pursuit of its desires, at the ground of which nihility has opened up as a sense of the meaninglessness of the whole business." 2 Both Nishitani and Karl Rahner see in the development of science and technology a tendency to manipulate the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Keiji Nishitani and Karl Rahner: A Response to Nihility

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 28 (1) – Nov 14, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
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1527-9472
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Abstract

ARTICLES Heidi Ann Russell Institute of Pastoral Studies at Loyola University Chicago In his essay "Kenosis and Emptiness," Buddhist scholar Masao Abe states that "the necessity of tackling the Buddhist-Christian dialogue not merely in terms of interfaith dialogue, but also as an inseparable part of the wider sociocultural problem of religion versus irreligion has become more and more pressing in the past few decades." 1 From Keiji Nishitani's perspective a culture of self-centeredness has developed out of the inability of many people to move beyond a sense of nihilism in their lives. Furthermore, technological advances and an increased understanding of the laws of nature have allowed humans to manipulate those laws for their own purposes. In this development, Nishitani believes that "the perversion that occurred in the original relationship of man to the laws of nature has taken the shape of a fundamental intertwining of the mechanization of man and his transformation into a subject in pursuit of its desires, at the ground of which nihility has opened up as a sense of the meaninglessness of the whole business." 2 Both Nishitani and Karl Rahner see in the development of science and technology a tendency to manipulate the

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 14, 2008

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