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Ke Kulana He Mahu: Remembering a Sense of Place (review)

Ke Kulana He Mahu: Remembering a Sense of Place (review) book and media reviews visuals portray an exotic culture and society, although context is thin in scenes of the new church, which stands mute on the relationship between mission and masks. The complicated relationship between selfsufficiency, development, and global capitalism is merely hinted at, and despite their indispensable participation, women's voices are left out. I recommend this film for introductory anthropology or Melanesian ethnography courses to explore the integration of art, religion, and daily life; concepts of tradition and change; globalization and development; religious syncretism; gender relations; urban-rural connections; and issues around "doing" ethnography and making ethnographic films. and gay people in Hawai`i today, the film asks us to ponder a question posed by Kanaka Maoli activist Ku`umealoha Gomes at the beginning of the film: "Where did the change come from?" The question is a rhetorical one, and the film does not provide any explicit answers; rather, it forces us to draw our own conclusions by making sense of the montage of testimonies, interviews, dance performances, old photographs, artistic renderings, and scenes of ocean and landscapes presented to us. The film can be divided roughly into three sections. The first part examines külana (place, station, status, rank) in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Ke Kulana He Mahu: Remembering a Sense of Place (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 15 (1) – Feb 10, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book and media reviews visuals portray an exotic culture and society, although context is thin in scenes of the new church, which stands mute on the relationship between mission and masks. The complicated relationship between selfsufficiency, development, and global capitalism is merely hinted at, and despite their indispensable participation, women's voices are left out. I recommend this film for introductory anthropology or Melanesian ethnography courses to explore the integration of art, religion, and daily life; concepts of tradition and change; globalization and development; religious syncretism; gender relations; urban-rural connections; and issues around "doing" ethnography and making ethnographic films. and gay people in Hawai`i today, the film asks us to ponder a question posed by Kanaka Maoli activist Ku`umealoha Gomes at the beginning of the film: "Where did the change come from?" The question is a rhetorical one, and the film does not provide any explicit answers; rather, it forces us to draw our own conclusions by making sense of the montage of testimonies, interviews, dance performances, old photographs, artistic renderings, and scenes of ocean and landscapes presented to us. The film can be divided roughly into three sections. The first part examines külana (place, station, status, rank) in

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 10, 2003

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