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Kau Faito'o: Traditional Healers of Tonga (review)

Kau Faito'o: Traditional Healers of Tonga (review) dynamics of cultural identity, and, in a Pacific context, debates about contested issues of authenticity. This said, the film remains puzzlingly thin with regard to ethnographic information. ing, and visuals are augmented with clean editing, eloquent narration, and subtitles providing adequate translations without distracting from the events occurring on the screen. The film is engaging and enjoyable to watch. The scene opens at the blowholes of Tongatapu, with narrator Loa Niumeitolu Saafi describing the story of Maui who, with his magical hook and great strength, fished the islands of Tonga up from the bottom of the sea before the first Tongans arrived some 3,500 years ago. Of her people she says: "Tongans are a proud people with familial bonds to the land. We believe that through loyalty to kinship and the mercy of God we will continue to retain and own our sovereignty. Our independence has helped us maintain and nurture sacred practices." The opening description of Tonga as a place with a turbulent history but also protective cultural attributes offers the standardized image of Tonga that was cultivated and honed during the long twentiethcentury reign of Queen Sälote. Social practices grounded in Tongan notions of kinship and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Kau Faito'o: Traditional Healers of Tonga (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 16 (1) – Jan 23, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

dynamics of cultural identity, and, in a Pacific context, debates about contested issues of authenticity. This said, the film remains puzzlingly thin with regard to ethnographic information. ing, and visuals are augmented with clean editing, eloquent narration, and subtitles providing adequate translations without distracting from the events occurring on the screen. The film is engaging and enjoyable to watch. The scene opens at the blowholes of Tongatapu, with narrator Loa Niumeitolu Saafi describing the story of Maui who, with his magical hook and great strength, fished the islands of Tonga up from the bottom of the sea before the first Tongans arrived some 3,500 years ago. Of her people she says: "Tongans are a proud people with familial bonds to the land. We believe that through loyalty to kinship and the mercy of God we will continue to retain and own our sovereignty. Our independence has helped us maintain and nurture sacred practices." The opening description of Tonga as a place with a turbulent history but also protective cultural attributes offers the standardized image of Tonga that was cultivated and honed during the long twentiethcentury reign of Queen Sälote. Social practices grounded in Tongan notions of kinship and

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 23, 2004

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