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Kainga Tahi Kainga Rua: New Work on Banaba (review)

Kainga Tahi Kainga Rua: New Work on Banaba (review) book and media reviews Blockbuster Video Audience Award for the Best Feature Film, based on votes from members of the Honolulu audience. The film's first screening at the Honolulu Academy of Arts on 6 November 2002 was preceded by an elaborate protocol that lasted more than thirty minutes, in which students from the Halau Ku Mana welcomed the Mäori actors, producer, and director. Flowers, chants, songs, and speeches were exchanged on both sides, affirming the connections between the native Hawaiians and the Mäori performers and filmmakers. The audience included Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, participants in the conference, and members of the general public. After we watched the film, its director, Don Selwyn, said in effect to those in the audience, "You can do this too. You can make your own movies, with native Hawaiian actors using your own language." The response from many in the audience suggested that this was an important and moving moment. As they have done with their immersion schools, the Mäori people may be helping others in the Pacific find ways to represent their cultures and revision their futures. While I hope and believe that there will be many more stories and films arising directly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Kainga Tahi Kainga Rua: New Work on Banaba (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 16 (2) – Aug 31, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews Blockbuster Video Audience Award for the Best Feature Film, based on votes from members of the Honolulu audience. The film's first screening at the Honolulu Academy of Arts on 6 November 2002 was preceded by an elaborate protocol that lasted more than thirty minutes, in which students from the Halau Ku Mana welcomed the Mäori actors, producer, and director. Flowers, chants, songs, and speeches were exchanged on both sides, affirming the connections between the native Hawaiians and the Mäori performers and filmmakers. The audience included Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, participants in the conference, and members of the general public. After we watched the film, its director, Don Selwyn, said in effect to those in the audience, "You can do this too. You can make your own movies, with native Hawaiian actors using your own language." The response from many in the audience suggested that this was an important and moving moment. As they have done with their immersion schools, the Mäori people may be helping others in the Pacific find ways to represent their cultures and revision their futures. While I hope and believe that there will be many more stories and films arising directly

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 31, 2004

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