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John Dewey, Liang Shuming, and China’s Education Reform: Cultivating Individuality by Huajun Zhang (review)

John Dewey, Liang Shuming, and China’s Education Reform: Cultivating Individuality by Huajun... on global capitalism and on our view of the status of unsustainable levels of global resource inequity. The final two articles of the book, Andrew Terjesen's "Is Empathy the `One Thread' Running through Confucianism?" and Marion Hourdequin's "The Limits of Empathy" both address issues facing any empathy-based ethics such as Confucianism that is commonly interpreted as rooted in "shu" . Terjesen asks for a more complex conversation, noting that we must be mindful of the different types of empathy (cognitive, affective, or conative), the different problems associated with each, and the different ways that each explains how and why empathy generates motivation. Hourdequin's essay criticizes Slote's suggestion that a "fully developed" empathetic sense can on its own provide proper action guidance, since empathy itself cannot provide an account of what "fully developed" empathy resembles. Using case studies from Mencius, she notes that in Confucianism empathy is shaped and directed though ritual (li), and that here the content of li is not given by empathy, but ultimately by dao. Unfortunately, ontological articulation (dao) is not available to the modern. Consequently, Hourdequin suggests that when we can "know what morality is for, perhaps we can see more clearly how empathy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

John Dewey, Liang Shuming, and China’s Education Reform: Cultivating Individuality by Huajun Zhang (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 65 (4) – Oct 23, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1529-1898
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Abstract

on global capitalism and on our view of the status of unsustainable levels of global resource inequity. The final two articles of the book, Andrew Terjesen's "Is Empathy the `One Thread' Running through Confucianism?" and Marion Hourdequin's "The Limits of Empathy" both address issues facing any empathy-based ethics such as Confucianism that is commonly interpreted as rooted in "shu" . Terjesen asks for a more complex conversation, noting that we must be mindful of the different types of empathy (cognitive, affective, or conative), the different problems associated with each, and the different ways that each explains how and why empathy generates motivation. Hourdequin's essay criticizes Slote's suggestion that a "fully developed" empathetic sense can on its own provide proper action guidance, since empathy itself cannot provide an account of what "fully developed" empathy resembles. Using case studies from Mencius, she notes that in Confucianism empathy is shaped and directed though ritual (li), and that here the content of li is not given by empathy, but ultimately by dao. Unfortunately, ontological articulation (dao) is not available to the modern. Consequently, Hourdequin suggests that when we can "know what morality is for, perhaps we can see more clearly how empathy

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 23, 2015

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