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Jean-Marie Tjibaou, Kanak Witness to the World: An Intellectual Biography (review)

Jean-Marie Tjibaou, Kanak Witness to the World: An Intellectual Biography (review) the contemporary pacific · 22:1 (2010) thousand French conscripts to New Caledonia and reversed progress toward realization of Kanak demands. Sharp differences emerged among the independence supporters. Some, such as Wéa, saw growing confrontation as the only way forward; others, especially Tjibaou, were aware of their lack of arms and power and instead sought dialogue. A bungled confrontation on Ouvéa in 1988 led to a fierce military intervention in which nineteen young Kanaks were killed on the land of Wéa's village. Three days later, in France, socialist François Mitterand was reelected president, and Chirac's "cohabitation" government lost power. The new prime minister, Michel Rocard, took immediate steps to reopen dialogue in New Caledonia. He brought delegations of both Kanaks and Europeans to Paris, where they were sat down in the Hôtel Matignon until they reached an agreement, which they did very swiftly. It included new constitutional arrangements in New Caledonia, strong measures to strengthen the economy of the Kanak regions, and a referendum on independence, but only in ten years' time. Not all the flnks representatives signed, and Tjibaou and Yeiwéné had to work very hard to convince their people at home that they had done the right http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Jean-Marie Tjibaou, Kanak Witness to the World: An Intellectual Biography (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 22 (1) – Feb 21, 2010

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-9464
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 22:1 (2010) thousand French conscripts to New Caledonia and reversed progress toward realization of Kanak demands. Sharp differences emerged among the independence supporters. Some, such as Wéa, saw growing confrontation as the only way forward; others, especially Tjibaou, were aware of their lack of arms and power and instead sought dialogue. A bungled confrontation on Ouvéa in 1988 led to a fierce military intervention in which nineteen young Kanaks were killed on the land of Wéa's village. Three days later, in France, socialist François Mitterand was reelected president, and Chirac's "cohabitation" government lost power. The new prime minister, Michel Rocard, took immediate steps to reopen dialogue in New Caledonia. He brought delegations of both Kanaks and Europeans to Paris, where they were sat down in the Hôtel Matignon until they reached an agreement, which they did very swiftly. It included new constitutional arrangements in New Caledonia, strong measures to strengthen the economy of the Kanak regions, and a referendum on independence, but only in ten years' time. Not all the flnks representatives signed, and Tjibaou and Yeiwéné had to work very hard to convince their people at home that they had done the right

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 21, 2010

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