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Japanese Scholarship on the Sino-Japanese War: Principle Trends and Achievements, 2007–2012

Japanese Scholarship on the Sino-Japanese War: Principle Trends and Achievements, 2007–2012 R E A D I N G S F R O M A S IA DUAN RUICONG Keio University Translated by Joseph Passman, University of California, Berkeley INTRODUCTION The year 2012 marked the fortieth anniversary of diplomatic relations between Japan and the People's Republic of China. However, as a result of the Japanese government's September 11, 2012, announcement of its intention to "nationalize" the Diaoyu (Senkaku) Islands, protests broke out across many Chinese cities, leading to a serious deterioration of Sino-Japanese relations. A September 2012 public opinion poll conducted by Japan's Cabinet Office indicated that 80.6 percent of Japanese citizens surveyed did not have favorable feelings toward China and 92.8 percent considered the state of Sino-Japanese relations to be poor.1 Relations between the two countries had worsened not only because of concrete factors (like the Diaoyu Islands dispute) but also as a result of historical influences. When speaking of historical influences in this context, one cannot avoid the topic of the Sino-Japanese War. Therefore, for the benefit of the reader, I will examine in detail the last five years of Japanese scholarship related to the Sino-Japanese War, highlighting its principle trends and achievements. Within the broad range and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

Japanese Scholarship on the Sino-Japanese War: Principle Trends and Achievements, 2007–2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9674
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Abstract

R E A D I N G S F R O M A S IA DUAN RUICONG Keio University Translated by Joseph Passman, University of California, Berkeley INTRODUCTION The year 2012 marked the fortieth anniversary of diplomatic relations between Japan and the People's Republic of China. However, as a result of the Japanese government's September 11, 2012, announcement of its intention to "nationalize" the Diaoyu (Senkaku) Islands, protests broke out across many Chinese cities, leading to a serious deterioration of Sino-Japanese relations. A September 2012 public opinion poll conducted by Japan's Cabinet Office indicated that 80.6 percent of Japanese citizens surveyed did not have favorable feelings toward China and 92.8 percent considered the state of Sino-Japanese relations to be poor.1 Relations between the two countries had worsened not only because of concrete factors (like the Diaoyu Islands dispute) but also as a result of historical influences. When speaking of historical influences in this context, one cannot avoid the topic of the Sino-Japanese War. Therefore, for the benefit of the reader, I will examine in detail the last five years of Japanese scholarship related to the Sino-Japanese War, highlighting its principle trends and achievements. Within the broad range and

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 3, 2014

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