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Jade Dragon (review)

Jade Dragon (review) book reviews a list of relevant publications would also have been welcome additions. For instance, in an extract from an 1895 letter reproduced here on p. 20, W. G. Aston wrote to Gowland that he was ``Glad to hear Mrs. Gowland and the young person are flourishing.'' Since we are told that Gowland was unmarried while in Japan ( p. 18), could it be that his new wife and child explain his delay in publishing his research as much as his reluctance to be controversial while actually in Japan? Perhaps the major frustration with this book is that it never makes explicit exactly what is and is not known about Gowland's life. Without doubt, however, this volume presents a timely reevaluation of Gowland's archaeological work in Japan, work that had been largely forgotten by the Japanese archaeological community. Together with Edward Morse, Heinrich von Siebold, and others, Gowland was one of a number of Western scholars who were influential in the development of archaeology in Meiji Japan. To call Gowland ``The Father of Japanese Archaeology'' is surely an exaggeration, but he was certainly a major founding figure. As this book makes clear through letters and other materials, Gowland http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Jade Dragon (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 45 (1) – Mar 27, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
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Abstract

book reviews a list of relevant publications would also have been welcome additions. For instance, in an extract from an 1895 letter reproduced here on p. 20, W. G. Aston wrote to Gowland that he was ``Glad to hear Mrs. Gowland and the young person are flourishing.'' Since we are told that Gowland was unmarried while in Japan ( p. 18), could it be that his new wife and child explain his delay in publishing his research as much as his reluctance to be controversial while actually in Japan? Perhaps the major frustration with this book is that it never makes explicit exactly what is and is not known about Gowland's life. Without doubt, however, this volume presents a timely reevaluation of Gowland's archaeological work in Japan, work that had been largely forgotten by the Japanese archaeological community. Together with Edward Morse, Heinrich von Siebold, and others, Gowland was one of a number of Western scholars who were influential in the development of archaeology in Meiji Japan. To call Gowland ``The Father of Japanese Archaeology'' is surely an exaggeration, but he was certainly a major founding figure. As this book makes clear through letters and other materials, Gowland

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 27, 2006

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