Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Islamic Thought in China: Sino-Muslim Intellectual Evolution from the 17th to the 21st Century ed. by Jonathan Lipman (review)

Islamic Thought in China: Sino-Muslim Intellectual Evolution from the 17th to the 21st Century... China Review International: Vol. 22, No. 1, 2015 for creating a true conversation with Chinese counterparts as compared with a didactic monologue. The Futility of Law and Development chronicles numerous lost opportunities over several centuries for the United States to engage with China in a more thoughtful and less patronizing legal discourse. Yet it embraces the hope that past missteps need not dictate the future. Kroncke finds a glimmer of potential that America could "recaptur[e] our Founding cosmopolitanism" (p. 234). He sees this endeavor as requiring not just the efforts of legal academia but also of "the whole panoply of private and governmental institutions that today remain engaged with foreign law" (p. 234). If this full array of American actors can combine a vigorous process of self-reflection with incorrigible faith in the potential for productive legal discourse among nations, there is hope that Kroncke may find fertile ground for a more optimistic follow-on work, perhaps The Fruits of Law and Development? Margaret K. Lewis Margaret K. Lewis is a professor of law at Seton Hall University specializing in criminal justice in China. NOTES 1. Teemu Ruskola, Legal Orientalism: China, the United States, and Modern Law (Cambridge, MA: Harvard http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Islamic Thought in China: Sino-Muslim Intellectual Evolution from the 17th to the 21st Century ed. by Jonathan Lipman (review)

China Review International , Volume 22 (1) – Apr 14, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/islamic-thought-in-china-sino-muslim-intellectual-evolution-from-the-SiLaO690vJ
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

China Review International: Vol. 22, No. 1, 2015 for creating a true conversation with Chinese counterparts as compared with a didactic monologue. The Futility of Law and Development chronicles numerous lost opportunities over several centuries for the United States to engage with China in a more thoughtful and less patronizing legal discourse. Yet it embraces the hope that past missteps need not dictate the future. Kroncke finds a glimmer of potential that America could "recaptur[e] our Founding cosmopolitanism" (p. 234). He sees this endeavor as requiring not just the efforts of legal academia but also of "the whole panoply of private and governmental institutions that today remain engaged with foreign law" (p. 234). If this full array of American actors can combine a vigorous process of self-reflection with incorrigible faith in the potential for productive legal discourse among nations, there is hope that Kroncke may find fertile ground for a more optimistic follow-on work, perhaps The Fruits of Law and Development? Margaret K. Lewis Margaret K. Lewis is a professor of law at Seton Hall University specializing in criminal justice in China. NOTES 1. Teemu Ruskola, Legal Orientalism: China, the United States, and Modern Law (Cambridge, MA: Harvard

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 14, 2015

There are no references for this article.