Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Islamic Aesthetics: An Introduction (review)

Islamic Aesthetics: An Introduction (review) more useful to both scholars and practitioners. Also, the translators abbreviate ``Japanese'' as Jap., despite the preference of most translators for J., a potentially less offensive abbreviation. These quibbles, however, are truly minor relative to the high quality and importance of this translation. All readers will benefit greatly from this outstanding contribution to the study of Dogen and Zen Buddhism, and they may find that, like ¯ Ryokan, they will discover how Dogen's ``understanding beyond conditioned pat¯ ¯ terns cleans up the current corruptions'' (p. 70). Islamic Aesthetics: An Introduction. By Oliver Leaman. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2004. Pp. vii þ 211. Paper $25.00. Reviewed by Patrick S. O'Donnell Santa Barbara City College Oliver Leaman is a prolific philosopher, and he could be forgiven if, on occasion, quality made concessions to quantity. However, Islamic Aesthetics in no way disappoints. Indeed, it fills a yawning gap in Islamic Studies in splendid fashion, covering a subject that heretofore has received little systematic treatment and none whatsoever from philosophers of an analytic bent (with regard to professional training and methods, not ideological persuasion). What is more, it is utterly refreshing to find something under the rubric of aesthetics http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Islamic Aesthetics: An Introduction (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 57 (2) – Apr 23, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/islamic-aesthetics-an-introduction-review-bimoHV1iNY
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

more useful to both scholars and practitioners. Also, the translators abbreviate ``Japanese'' as Jap., despite the preference of most translators for J., a potentially less offensive abbreviation. These quibbles, however, are truly minor relative to the high quality and importance of this translation. All readers will benefit greatly from this outstanding contribution to the study of Dogen and Zen Buddhism, and they may find that, like ¯ Ryokan, they will discover how Dogen's ``understanding beyond conditioned pat¯ ¯ terns cleans up the current corruptions'' (p. 70). Islamic Aesthetics: An Introduction. By Oliver Leaman. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2004. Pp. vii þ 211. Paper $25.00. Reviewed by Patrick S. O'Donnell Santa Barbara City College Oliver Leaman is a prolific philosopher, and he could be forgiven if, on occasion, quality made concessions to quantity. However, Islamic Aesthetics in no way disappoints. Indeed, it fills a yawning gap in Islamic Studies in splendid fashion, covering a subject that heretofore has received little systematic treatment and none whatsoever from philosophers of an analytic bent (with regard to professional training and methods, not ideological persuasion). What is more, it is utterly refreshing to find something under the rubric of aesthetics

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 23, 2007

There are no references for this article.