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Islam: Religion, History, and Civilization (review)

Islam: Religion, History, and Civilization (review) Aristotelean throughout, this lack of explicit awareness (the Poetics is not cited in the bibliography) leads to some curious moments, as when the metamorphoses attending the final scenes of Akira (Otomo, 1988) are said to be, though hideous, ``also truly spectacular (in the postmodern sense of spectacle)'' (pp. 43­44). It is hard to know what to make of this, as spectacle is a key category for narrative in the Poetics. This exemplifies the piecemeal way in which positions are brought together. This quality in Napier's theoretical choices does not vitiate the quality and extent of the descriptions, and this is where the value of the book lies. In the Preface she tells of students from 1989 covertly approaching her after class to show her anime tapes they had gathered, subtitled by fans and circulated in an underground network that characterized early otaku (anime fan) culture. She has listened to her students, examining carefully the things they showed her, attending anime conventions with them, and following the discussion of anime in the American and Japanese popular press. Napier discerned the importance of anime five years before the rest of the academy, and retains a tonal accuracy and currency that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Islam: Religion, History, and Civilization (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 56 (3) – Jul 20, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
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Abstract

Aristotelean throughout, this lack of explicit awareness (the Poetics is not cited in the bibliography) leads to some curious moments, as when the metamorphoses attending the final scenes of Akira (Otomo, 1988) are said to be, though hideous, ``also truly spectacular (in the postmodern sense of spectacle)'' (pp. 43­44). It is hard to know what to make of this, as spectacle is a key category for narrative in the Poetics. This exemplifies the piecemeal way in which positions are brought together. This quality in Napier's theoretical choices does not vitiate the quality and extent of the descriptions, and this is where the value of the book lies. In the Preface she tells of students from 1989 covertly approaching her after class to show her anime tapes they had gathered, subtitled by fans and circulated in an underground network that characterized early otaku (anime fan) culture. She has listened to her students, examining carefully the things they showed her, attending anime conventions with them, and following the discussion of anime in the American and Japanese popular press. Napier discerned the importance of anime five years before the rest of the academy, and retains a tonal accuracy and currency that

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 20, 2006

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