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Ippolito Desideri S.J.: Opere e Bibliografia (review)

Ippolito Desideri S.J.: Opere e Bibliografia (review) BOOK REVIEWS Second, we are more likely to forge a postmetaphysical religious culture if, as Rorty and Vattimo suggest, we understand the social, political, and economic conditions that encourage, if not compel, human beings around the world to embrace and defend full-blown metaphysical religious claims and strive to create social, political, and economic institutions that are guided by the democratic principles of charity, solidarity, and love. In the era of unbridled transnational capitalism, what is needed, as Rorty suggests, among other changes, is "a global authority that could put global capitalism in the service of democracy" (p. 75). Amazon reviewer David E. McClean writes that the "upshot of Rorty's antifoundationalism and of Vattimo's hermeneutics is that charity (love) is what modernity [or postmodernity] must aim for" and yet, he asks, "is all of this discussion about antifoundationalism and hermeneutics, of Gadamer and Nietzsche, really necessary to get us to a conclusion that saints and prophets and martyrs have been reaching for thousands of years without such intellectual convolutions?" My own response to this question is both "yes" and "no." Yes, inasmuch as Rorty and Vattimo are speaking primarily to an academic audience. No, inasmuch as what is also http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Ippolito Desideri S.J.: Opere e Bibliografia (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 28 (1) – Nov 14, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Second, we are more likely to forge a postmetaphysical religious culture if, as Rorty and Vattimo suggest, we understand the social, political, and economic conditions that encourage, if not compel, human beings around the world to embrace and defend full-blown metaphysical religious claims and strive to create social, political, and economic institutions that are guided by the democratic principles of charity, solidarity, and love. In the era of unbridled transnational capitalism, what is needed, as Rorty suggests, among other changes, is "a global authority that could put global capitalism in the service of democracy" (p. 75). Amazon reviewer David E. McClean writes that the "upshot of Rorty's antifoundationalism and of Vattimo's hermeneutics is that charity (love) is what modernity [or postmodernity] must aim for" and yet, he asks, "is all of this discussion about antifoundationalism and hermeneutics, of Gadamer and Nietzsche, really necessary to get us to a conclusion that saints and prophets and martyrs have been reaching for thousands of years without such intellectual convolutions?" My own response to this question is both "yes" and "no." Yes, inasmuch as Rorty and Vattimo are speaking primarily to an academic audience. No, inasmuch as what is also

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 14, 2008

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