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Introduction to Liberation Theology and Engaged Buddhism

Introduction to Liberation Theology and Engaged Buddhism Kristin Johnston Largen Gettysburg Seminary As more and more people continue to discover, Buddhism and Christianity are fruitful dialogue partners, not least because while they have different significantly worldviews and orientations, their doctrines and practices often seem to be generally complementary, rather than contradictory. So, when these two religions are brought into conversation around a specific issue or challenge, often the result is that fresh light is cast onto an old problem, creating the possibility for creative thinking and new insights. Such is the case in the four articles that appear in this issue of the journal. All four articles take as their theme an encounter between Engaged Buddhism and liberation theology, asking what resources each has to offer the other, and what new interpretations and/or correctives might be shared in the course of the conversation. There are several common threads that weave through all the articles, and serve as touchstones for the overarching discussion. First and foremost is the dialectic between compassion (or love) and justice. Several authors note how sometimes these two attitudes are juxtaposed, as though they are opposites, when in reality, they stem from a similar motivation and share a similar purpose. And, even http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Introduction to Liberation Theology and Engaged Buddhism

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 36 – Oct 10, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

Kristin Johnston Largen Gettysburg Seminary As more and more people continue to discover, Buddhism and Christianity are fruitful dialogue partners, not least because while they have different significantly worldviews and orientations, their doctrines and practices often seem to be generally complementary, rather than contradictory. So, when these two religions are brought into conversation around a specific issue or challenge, often the result is that fresh light is cast onto an old problem, creating the possibility for creative thinking and new insights. Such is the case in the four articles that appear in this issue of the journal. All four articles take as their theme an encounter between Engaged Buddhism and liberation theology, asking what resources each has to offer the other, and what new interpretations and/or correctives might be shared in the course of the conversation. There are several common threads that weave through all the articles, and serve as touchstones for the overarching discussion. First and foremost is the dialectic between compassion (or love) and justice. Several authors note how sometimes these two attitudes are juxtaposed, as though they are opposites, when in reality, they stem from a similar motivation and share a similar purpose. And, even

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2016

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