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Introduction

Introduction W R I T I NG R E VOLU T I ON ACR O SS NOR T H E A S T A SI A STEVEN S. LEE University of California, Berkeley e 1 Th 917 October Revolution in relatively “backward” Russia was supposed to spark other revolutions across the industrial West. Already by 1920, how- ever, after several failed European uprisings, the Bolsheviks began pinning their hopes on Asia. In September 1920 the Third Communist International (Comintern) convened the First Congress of the Peoples of the East in Baku, where Comintern head Grigory Zinoviev declared “holy war” against West- ern imperialism (Riddell 1993, 78). The following year, as Katerina Clark notes in her contribution to this special issue, the First Congress of the Toil- ers of the Far East met in Irkutsk to promote international unity against both class and colonial oppression. In this vision, the Soviet Union, itself stretching to the Pacific, would be the center of a new, liberated world that would champion national independence alongside the interests of workers and peasants. Foundational, often Cold War-era studies of this topic tend to empha - size the shortcomings of Soviet engagement with the region, namely, the mismatch http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9666
eISSN
2158-9674

Abstract

W R I T I NG R E VOLU T I ON ACR O SS NOR T H E A S T A SI A STEVEN S. LEE University of California, Berkeley e 1 Th 917 October Revolution in relatively “backward” Russia was supposed to spark other revolutions across the industrial West. Already by 1920, how- ever, after several failed European uprisings, the Bolsheviks began pinning their hopes on Asia. In September 1920 the Third Communist International (Comintern) convened the First Congress of the Peoples of the East in Baku, where Comintern head Grigory Zinoviev declared “holy war” against West- ern imperialism (Riddell 1993, 78). The following year, as Katerina Clark notes in her contribution to this special issue, the First Congress of the Toil- ers of the Far East met in Irkutsk to promote international unity against both class and colonial oppression. In this vision, the Soviet Union, itself stretching to the Pacific, would be the center of a new, liberated world that would champion national independence alongside the interests of workers and peasants. Foundational, often Cold War-era studies of this topic tend to empha - size the shortcomings of Soviet engagement with the region, namely, the mismatch

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 22, 2018

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