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Introduction

Introduction t H e Pa s t a n d F u t u r e o F t H e Gai h ō z u (Ja P an e s e i mP e r i a L m a P s ) Kär En wig En, g u Est Editor Stanford University The spatial turn of recent years has brought a number of novel landscapes into focus for scholars of East Asia. One such frontier—locate-d at the inter section of urban development, state power, and territorialization—provides the conceptual ground for the papers guest edited by You-tien Hsing in this issue of Cross-Current.s Another—the domain of imperial cartography— undergirds the present collection of articles. Old maps have gained new life in the academy. No longer read solely for locational data (or evaluated in terms of scientific accuracy), maps are increasingly seen as cultural artifacts that bear on a wide spectrum of social and political problems. From the worldviews and spatial imaginations of their makers to the economic and ideological projects they adva - nced, histori cal maps speak to fundamental issues of both social scientic a fi nd humanistic inquiry. Informed by new interpretive questions from cultural geography and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
2158-9666
eISSN
2158-9674

Abstract

t H e Pa s t a n d F u t u r e o F t H e Gai h ō z u (Ja P an e s e i mP e r i a L m a P s ) Kär En wig En, g u Est Editor Stanford University The spatial turn of recent years has brought a number of novel landscapes into focus for scholars of East Asia. One such frontier—locate-d at the inter section of urban development, state power, and territorialization—provides the conceptual ground for the papers guest edited by You-tien Hsing in this issue of Cross-Current.s Another—the domain of imperial cartography— undergirds the present collection of articles. Old maps have gained new life in the academy. No longer read solely for locational data (or evaluated in terms of scientific accuracy), maps are increasingly seen as cultural artifacts that bear on a wide spectrum of social and political problems. From the worldviews and spatial imaginations of their makers to the economic and ideological projects they adva - nced, histori cal maps speak to fundamental issues of both social scientic a fi nd humanistic inquiry. Informed by new interpretive questions from cultural geography and

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 28, 2012

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