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Introduction: Buddhism and Contradiction

Introduction: Buddhism and Contradiction Department of Philosophy, University of Auckland k.tanaka@auckland.ac.nz Dialetheism is the view that some contradictions are true. This view needs to be distinguished from trivialism, which is the view that everything, including every contradiction, is true. According to dialetheists, there are some contradictions that cannot be defused and, thus, should be accepted.1 Armed with the modern development of paraconsistent logic, dialetheism is slowly being recognized as a view to be taken seriously in contemporary Western philosophy.2 In "The Way of the Dialetheist: Contradictions in Buddhism," published in Philosophy East and West in 2008, Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield, and Graham Priest (hereafter DGP) apply dialetheism to the interpretation of Buddhist texts. In opening the pages of Buddhist texts, it is not unusual to find sentences that appear to be contradictory. These contradictory sentences are not necessarily the expressions of inconsistency between one part of the text and another part of the text. They appear in one paragraph or sometimes even in one sentence. For example, What the realised one has described as the possession of distinctive features is itself the non-possession of distinctive features. (Vajracchedika 5) Everything is real and is not real, Both real and not real, Neither http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Introduction: Buddhism and Contradiction

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
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Abstract

Department of Philosophy, University of Auckland k.tanaka@auckland.ac.nz Dialetheism is the view that some contradictions are true. This view needs to be distinguished from trivialism, which is the view that everything, including every contradiction, is true. According to dialetheists, there are some contradictions that cannot be defused and, thus, should be accepted.1 Armed with the modern development of paraconsistent logic, dialetheism is slowly being recognized as a view to be taken seriously in contemporary Western philosophy.2 In "The Way of the Dialetheist: Contradictions in Buddhism," published in Philosophy East and West in 2008, Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield, and Graham Priest (hereafter DGP) apply dialetheism to the interpretation of Buddhist texts. In opening the pages of Buddhist texts, it is not unusual to find sentences that appear to be contradictory. These contradictory sentences are not necessarily the expressions of inconsistency between one part of the text and another part of the text. They appear in one paragraph or sometimes even in one sentence. For example, What the realised one has described as the possession of distinctive features is itself the non-possession of distinctive features. (Vajracchedika 5) Everything is real and is not real, Both real and not real, Neither

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 17, 2013

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