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Introduction

Introduction B IN D IN G M A RI T IM E C H IN A : C ON T R OL , E VA SI ON , A N D  I N T E R LOP I NG EUGENIO MENEGON Boston University PHILIP THAI Northeastern University XING HANG Brandeis University Maritime Asia is a confusing morass of contested sovereignties and geopo- litical rivalries. Yet the seaways of Asia have, in their history, also fostered cultural exchange and economic integration. The liminal maritime zone surrounding China remains a paradox between seas and ports teeming with legal and illegal exchange and governmental policies attempting to monopolize and restrict that exchange. Vast and fluid, maritime China has long hindered state control and fostered connections determined as much by bottom-up economic and cultural logic as by top-down official imposi - tions. This issue of Cross-Currents proposes to reexamine the rich history of maritime China and adjacent areas by tracing the interactions of the three initiatives of control, evasion, and interloping. This special issue stems from a conference the guest editors organized in Boston in 2015, with support from Boston University, Brandeis Univer- We sity, Northeastern University, and the Taiwan Ministry of Education. invited http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9666
eISSN
2158-9674

Abstract

B IN D IN G M A RI T IM E C H IN A : C ON T R OL , E VA SI ON , A N D  I N T E R LOP I NG EUGENIO MENEGON Boston University PHILIP THAI Northeastern University XING HANG Brandeis University Maritime Asia is a confusing morass of contested sovereignties and geopo- litical rivalries. Yet the seaways of Asia have, in their history, also fostered cultural exchange and economic integration. The liminal maritime zone surrounding China remains a paradox between seas and ports teeming with legal and illegal exchange and governmental policies attempting to monopolize and restrict that exchange. Vast and fluid, maritime China has long hindered state control and fostered connections determined as much by bottom-up economic and cultural logic as by top-down official imposi - tions. This issue of Cross-Currents proposes to reexamine the rich history of maritime China and adjacent areas by tracing the interactions of the three initiatives of control, evasion, and interloping. This special issue stems from a conference the guest editors organized in Boston in 2015, with support from Boston University, Brandeis Univer- We sity, Northeastern University, and the Taiwan Ministry of Education. invited

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 8, 2018

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