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Introduction

Introduction fter co-editing the two major collections of Korean American writing published in the last dozen years,1 I have come to see the compiling of anthologies as a kind of literary anthropology. The 2002 collection Kori (titled after the kri of shamanic rituals) was a nod to recovery ethnography, an attempt to show the lay of the land and to reveal the themes that carried over from the "old" to "new" literary cultures. Century of the Tiger, which followed soon after, was designed as a celebration of cultural connections to honor one hundred years of Korean immigration. The following year, I speculated on the future of Korean American literature at the 10th Annual Han Moo-Sook Colloquium in the Korean Humanities.2 It's been just over a decade, and much of what I predicted then about the impact of the "collapse" of traditional American mainstream publishing, the opportunities of new media, and the emergence of ethnic writers in genre fiction has come to pass. For this special section of AZALEA, my co-editor Minsoo Kang and 1. Kori: The Beacon Anthology of Korean American Literature, co-edited with Walter K. Lew (Beacon Press, 2002); and Century of the Tiger: One Hundred Years of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture University of Hawai'I Press

Introduction

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture , Volume 7 (1)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1944-6500
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Abstract

fter co-editing the two major collections of Korean American writing published in the last dozen years,1 I have come to see the compiling of anthologies as a kind of literary anthropology. The 2002 collection Kori (titled after the kri of shamanic rituals) was a nod to recovery ethnography, an attempt to show the lay of the land and to reveal the themes that carried over from the "old" to "new" literary cultures. Century of the Tiger, which followed soon after, was designed as a celebration of cultural connections to honor one hundred years of Korean immigration. The following year, I speculated on the future of Korean American literature at the 10th Annual Han Moo-Sook Colloquium in the Korean Humanities.2 It's been just over a decade, and much of what I predicted then about the impact of the "collapse" of traditional American mainstream publishing, the opportunities of new media, and the emergence of ethnic writers in genre fiction has come to pass. For this special section of AZALEA, my co-editor Minsoo Kang and 1. Kori: The Beacon Anthology of Korean American Literature, co-edited with Walter K. Lew (Beacon Press, 2002); and Century of the Tiger: One Hundred Years of

Journal

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & CultureUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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