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Introduction

Introduction D IA S P O R I C A R T A N D KO R E A N I D E N T I T Y HIJOO SON Phillips Academy JOOYEON RHEE The Hebrew University of Jerusalem OVERVIE W This special issue of Cross-Currents , titled “Diasporic Art and Korean Iden- tity,” is the fruit of a two-day conference on “Korean Diaspora and the Arts” held at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in May 2017. The contributors explore new delineations of the political, social, cultural, and emotional landscapes inhabited by Koreans living in diaspora. Korean diasporic artists investigate the meaning of “Koreanness” through their paintings, political cartoons, theater, film, documentary, photographs, and multimedia art. e Th topic of diaspora—which Gabriel Sheffer defines as “ethnic minority groups residing and acting in host countries while maintaining material and senti- mental ties to their homelands”—has received impressive scholarly attention in the humanities and social sciences, and Korean diaspora studies has been part of this trend (Sheffer 1986, 3). Seven million Koreans currently live outside the Korean peninsula, making them the fifth largest diasporic population at a time when 250 mil - lion people worldwide live outside their homelands. This special issue http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9666
eISSN
2158-9674

Abstract

D IA S P O R I C A R T A N D KO R E A N I D E N T I T Y HIJOO SON Phillips Academy JOOYEON RHEE The Hebrew University of Jerusalem OVERVIE W This special issue of Cross-Currents , titled “Diasporic Art and Korean Iden- tity,” is the fruit of a two-day conference on “Korean Diaspora and the Arts” held at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in May 2017. The contributors explore new delineations of the political, social, cultural, and emotional landscapes inhabited by Koreans living in diaspora. Korean diasporic artists investigate the meaning of “Koreanness” through their paintings, political cartoons, theater, film, documentary, photographs, and multimedia art. e Th topic of diaspora—which Gabriel Sheffer defines as “ethnic minority groups residing and acting in host countries while maintaining material and senti- mental ties to their homelands”—has received impressive scholarly attention in the humanities and social sciences, and Korean diaspora studies has been part of this trend (Sheffer 1986, 3). Seven million Koreans currently live outside the Korean peninsula, making them the fifth largest diasporic population at a time when 250 mil - lion people worldwide live outside their homelands. This special issue

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 18, 2019

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