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Introduction

Introduction M E D I AT I N G C H I N E S E N E S S IN CAMBODIA Cornell University In recognition of his cornerstone work on Chinese communities in Cambodia, we dedicate this special issue of Cross-Currents to William E. Willmott. -- and Penny Edwards, Ithaca and Berkeley, November 2012 In 1981, social anthropologist William Willmott declared, "Today, no-one identifies themselves as Chinese in Kampuchea [Cambodia]" (1981:45). He certainly had the authority to publish such a statement. Having conducted sustained fieldwork on Chinese community formation in Cambodia from 1962 to 1963, Willmott offered an unprecedented examination of social structures, political organization, and patterns of identification among urban Chinese in his monographs, The Chinese in Cambodia (1967) and The Political Structure of the Chinese Community in Cambodia (1970). However, subsequent to his research, Chinese communities suffered terribly during the repression of the Lon Nol government between 1970 and 1975 and the atrocities of the Democratic Kampuchea regime. Willmott thus declared Chinese communities--and a willingness to identify as Chinese--destroyed. This understandably pessimistic vision turned out to be unfounded; the next extensive research done on Chinese in Cambodia by Penny Edwards and Chan Sambath in 1995 showed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9674
Publisher site
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Abstract

M E D I AT I N G C H I N E S E N E S S IN CAMBODIA Cornell University In recognition of his cornerstone work on Chinese communities in Cambodia, we dedicate this special issue of Cross-Currents to William E. Willmott. -- and Penny Edwards, Ithaca and Berkeley, November 2012 In 1981, social anthropologist William Willmott declared, "Today, no-one identifies themselves as Chinese in Kampuchea [Cambodia]" (1981:45). He certainly had the authority to publish such a statement. Having conducted sustained fieldwork on Chinese community formation in Cambodia from 1962 to 1963, Willmott offered an unprecedented examination of social structures, political organization, and patterns of identification among urban Chinese in his monographs, The Chinese in Cambodia (1967) and The Political Structure of the Chinese Community in Cambodia (1970). However, subsequent to his research, Chinese communities suffered terribly during the repression of the Lon Nol government between 1970 and 1975 and the atrocities of the Democratic Kampuchea regime. Willmott thus declared Chinese communities--and a willingness to identify as Chinese--destroyed. This understandably pessimistic vision turned out to be unfounded; the next extensive research done on Chinese in Cambodia by Penny Edwards and Chan Sambath in 1995 showed

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 30, 2012

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