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Introduction

Introduction ( d e ) m e m o r ia l izi n G t h e Ko r e a n Wa r : a CritiCal intervention Rutgers University Speaking to veterans on July 27, 2013, at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington DC, President Obama declared the Korean War a victory for the United States in an effort to challenge its status in American memory as a forgotten war. It is worth quoting his remarks at length to appreciate the change in emphasis on the war's "victory" from what had previously been a focus on the hardships of an unknown war: That July day, when the fighting finally ended, not far from where it began, some suggested this sacrifice had been for naught, and they summed it up with a phrase --"die for a tie.". . . But here, today, we can say with confidence that war was no tie. Korea was a victory. When fifty million South Koreans live in freedom--a vibrant democracy, one of the world's most dynamic economies, in stark contrast to the repression and poverty of the North--that's a victory; that's your legacy. When our soldiers stand firm along the DMZ; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9674
Publisher site
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Abstract

( d e ) m e m o r ia l izi n G t h e Ko r e a n Wa r : a CritiCal intervention Rutgers University Speaking to veterans on July 27, 2013, at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington DC, President Obama declared the Korean War a victory for the United States in an effort to challenge its status in American memory as a forgotten war. It is worth quoting his remarks at length to appreciate the change in emphasis on the war's "victory" from what had previously been a focus on the hardships of an unknown war: That July day, when the fighting finally ended, not far from where it began, some suggested this sacrifice had been for naught, and they summed it up with a phrase --"die for a tie.". . . But here, today, we can say with confidence that war was no tie. Korea was a victory. When fifty million South Koreans live in freedom--a vibrant democracy, one of the world's most dynamic economies, in stark contrast to the repression and poverty of the North--that's a victory; that's your legacy. When our soldiers stand firm along the DMZ;

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 20, 2015

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