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Interview with Albert Wendt: Art, Writing, and the Creative Process

Interview with Albert Wendt: Art, Writing, and the Creative Process Interview with Albert Wendt: Art, Writing, and the Creative Process Vilsoni Hereniko A lbert Wendt, the famous Samoan novelist and poet, has been in the Cit- izens’ Chair at the English Department of the University of Hawai‘i since August 2004, having taken a leave of absence from the University of Auck- land where he has taught for the past sixteen years. A few months after Al’s arrival, I heard from Reina Whaitiri, his partner and the person he calls “the center of my life now,” that he was spending most of his free time drawing and painting. She said that the creative muse had taken hold of Al and that he couldn’t stop. Their apartment, she said, had evidence of the artist at work on the floor, on the dining table, on the walls, every- where! Over subsequent months, I continued to make inquiries about Al’s progress and kept hoping that he would soon invite me to see his art. Finally the invitation came: “What are you doing?” he said over the phone. “Would you and Jeannette like to come for morning tea and have a look at the art?” “When?” I asked. “What about ten o’clock today?” On http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Interview with Albert Wendt: Art, Writing, and the Creative Process

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

Interview with Albert Wendt: Art, Writing, and the Creative Process Vilsoni Hereniko A lbert Wendt, the famous Samoan novelist and poet, has been in the Cit- izens’ Chair at the English Department of the University of Hawai‘i since August 2004, having taken a leave of absence from the University of Auck- land where he has taught for the past sixteen years. A few months after Al’s arrival, I heard from Reina Whaitiri, his partner and the person he calls “the center of my life now,” that he was spending most of his free time drawing and painting. She said that the creative muse had taken hold of Al and that he couldn’t stop. Their apartment, she said, had evidence of the artist at work on the floor, on the dining table, on the walls, every- where! Over subsequent months, I continued to make inquiries about Al’s progress and kept hoping that he would soon invite me to see his art. Finally the invitation came: “What are you doing?” he said over the phone. “Would you and Jeannette like to come for morning tea and have a look at the art?” “When?” I asked. “What about ten o’clock today?” On

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 6, 2005

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