Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Interpreting the Self: Autobiography in the Arabic Literary Tradition (review)

Interpreting the Self: Autobiography in the Arabic Literary Tradition (review) 06-reviews 10/29/02 10:31 AM Page 687 Reviews 687 to explicate the texts they consider. Thus, to oversimplify, Martha Nell Smith teaches us a good deal about Emily Dickinson and her work by exam- ining the poet’s intimate relationship with her sister-in-law Susan Dickin- son. Smith demonstrates how “the near-hegemonic prevalence of conscrip- tive heterosexual story lines renders inscrutable the imaginary explosion of one woman lover to another beloved woman.” She concludes that “study of their correspondence . . . reveals how the two equated poetic union, or lin- guistic coition, with erotic union, how false our distinction can be between textual study and biography, and how, for them, in the words of Emily, ‘Poetry and Love . . . coeval come.’” Richard Hardack considers Melville’s passionate friendship with Haw- thorne in much the same fashion as Smith does that of the Dickinsons. Haw- thorne’s great influence on Melville is common knowledge; what Hardack does is demonstrate that Melville’s letters to Hawthorne permit “men to reproduce new texts together, to reproduce matter without mother. The self- reliant male writer joins his body and letters to those of other writers, and Melville’s epistolary intertextuality with Hawthorne’s comes to represent his form http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Interpreting the Self: Autobiography in the Arabic Literary Tradition (review)

Biography , Volume 25 (4) – Jan 6, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/interpreting-the-self-autobiography-in-the-arabic-literary-tradition-0k1GPHpigc
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

06-reviews 10/29/02 10:31 AM Page 687 Reviews 687 to explicate the texts they consider. Thus, to oversimplify, Martha Nell Smith teaches us a good deal about Emily Dickinson and her work by exam- ining the poet’s intimate relationship with her sister-in-law Susan Dickin- son. Smith demonstrates how “the near-hegemonic prevalence of conscrip- tive heterosexual story lines renders inscrutable the imaginary explosion of one woman lover to another beloved woman.” She concludes that “study of their correspondence . . . reveals how the two equated poetic union, or lin- guistic coition, with erotic union, how false our distinction can be between textual study and biography, and how, for them, in the words of Emily, ‘Poetry and Love . . . coeval come.’” Richard Hardack considers Melville’s passionate friendship with Haw- thorne in much the same fashion as Smith does that of the Dickinsons. Haw- thorne’s great influence on Melville is common knowledge; what Hardack does is demonstrate that Melville’s letters to Hawthorne permit “men to reproduce new texts together, to reproduce matter without mother. The self- reliant male writer joins his body and letters to those of other writers, and Melville’s epistolary intertextuality with Hawthorne’s comes to represent his form

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 6, 2003

There are no references for this article.