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Integrating Archaeology and Ethnohistory: The Development of Exchange between Yap and Ulithi, Western Caroline Islands (review)

Integrating Archaeology and Ethnohistory: The Development of Exchange between Yap and Ulithi,... this discussion in human terms, inviting the reader to consider the universals of how people express themselves and attempt to come to terms with larger social and natural processes. Possehl ends his substantive discussion of the Indus culture with a detailed and comprehensive chapter on the ``Middle Asian Interaction Sphere,'' his term for the economic and social relations among the Bronze Age cultures of Mesopotamia, the Persian Gulf, and the Turanian Basin of Central Asia. This excellent chapter brings together a wealth of scholarship on regions that are often examined separately but are shown to have sustained significant amounts of contact through long-distance exchange. The chapter shows the nature and importance of ``foreign'' trade for Indus peoples, but it also puts those other regions in perspective. Treated from the Indus point of view, Mesopotamia is just one among many flourishing zones of Bronze Age commerce and innovation. Indeed, we are likely to learn a great deal about the Indus from places elsewhere in the Near East (one potential scenario is that the now heavily looted sites of Iraq may yield a bilingual Indus-cuneiform inscription that could enable us to decipher the Indus script; archaeologists would do well to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Integrating Archaeology and Ethnohistory: The Development of Exchange between Yap and Ulithi, Western Caroline Islands (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 45 (2) – Apr 10, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
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Abstract

this discussion in human terms, inviting the reader to consider the universals of how people express themselves and attempt to come to terms with larger social and natural processes. Possehl ends his substantive discussion of the Indus culture with a detailed and comprehensive chapter on the ``Middle Asian Interaction Sphere,'' his term for the economic and social relations among the Bronze Age cultures of Mesopotamia, the Persian Gulf, and the Turanian Basin of Central Asia. This excellent chapter brings together a wealth of scholarship on regions that are often examined separately but are shown to have sustained significant amounts of contact through long-distance exchange. The chapter shows the nature and importance of ``foreign'' trade for Indus peoples, but it also puts those other regions in perspective. Treated from the Indus point of view, Mesopotamia is just one among many flourishing zones of Bronze Age commerce and innovation. Indeed, we are likely to learn a great deal about the Indus from places elsewhere in the Near East (one potential scenario is that the now heavily looted sites of Iraq may yield a bilingual Indus-cuneiform inscription that could enable us to decipher the Indus script; archaeologists would do well to

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 10, 2006

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