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Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (review)

Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (review) Â Ç The final section begins with an evaluation of Sankara's position in Advaita Â Ç thought, and Nakamura makes a surprisingly emphatic case for Sankara as a derivative thinker, arguing that all his key ideas had previous advocates. According to Â Ç Nakamura, Sankara should be remembered as an interpreter, synthesizer, and monastery founder, but certainly not as an original philosopher. He then offers an informative but unexceptional summary of the history of early Vedanta philosophy, and Å Â Ç more analysis of Sankara's views, particularly on the role of meditation and the place of Yoga according to his Brahmasutra and other commentaries. Nakamura makes Å Â Ç some interesting but unsystematic points about Sankara's possible vivarana on the Ç Yogasutrabhasya, although here, again, scholarship has moved on since he wrote Å Å Ç (one can particularly consult the work of T. S. Rukmani and Trevor Leggett). The appendixes also include brief portions of an interview with Candrasekharendra Â Ç Sarasvati, the late Sankaracarya of Kanchipuram. Å Å Again, while much of the material here is dated, students of Indian thought should be grateful for this book; it will take its place in the libraries of all http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 55 (3) – Jul 7, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
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Abstract

Â Ç The final section begins with an evaluation of Sankara's position in Advaita Â Ç thought, and Nakamura makes a surprisingly emphatic case for Sankara as a derivative thinker, arguing that all his key ideas had previous advocates. According to Â Ç Nakamura, Sankara should be remembered as an interpreter, synthesizer, and monastery founder, but certainly not as an original philosopher. He then offers an informative but unexceptional summary of the history of early Vedanta philosophy, and Å Â Ç more analysis of Sankara's views, particularly on the role of meditation and the place of Yoga according to his Brahmasutra and other commentaries. Nakamura makes Å Â Ç some interesting but unsystematic points about Sankara's possible vivarana on the Ç Yogasutrabhasya, although here, again, scholarship has moved on since he wrote Å Å Ç (one can particularly consult the work of T. S. Rukmani and Trevor Leggett). The appendixes also include brief portions of an interview with Candrasekharendra Â Ç Sarasvati, the late Sankaracarya of Kanchipuram. Å Å Again, while much of the material here is dated, students of Indian thought should be grateful for this book; it will take its place in the libraries of all

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 7, 2005

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