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Indian Buddhist Philosophy by Amber D. Carpenter (review)

Indian Buddhist Philosophy by Amber D. Carpenter (review) Indian Buddhist Philosophy. By Amber D. Carpenter. Durham, UK: Acumen Publish- ing, 2014. Pp. v–xvii + 313. isbn 978-1-84-465298-3. Reviewed by Malcolm Keating Yale-NUS College malcolm.keating@yale-nus.edu.sg Authors generally take one of two approaches to surveying Buddhist philosophy. There is the historically oriented introduction, which charts the development from early Abhidharma to later Madhyamaka and Yogācāra. Examples of this style include David Kalupahana’s A History of Buddhist Philosophy: Continuities and Disconti- nuities (1992) and Paul Williams and Anthony Tribe’s Buddhist Thought (2000). Then there is the topic-oriented introduction, which focuses on major questions under discussion (What is suffering and how do we end it? What is the theory of no-self? How does the concept of emptiness square with the doctrine of rebirth?). Mark Gowan’s Philosophy of the Buddha: An Introduction (2003) and Mark Siderits’ Bud- dhism as Philosophy (2007) and are two instances of this approach. The risk in focusing on historical development is losing the philosophical thread in a morass of texts and commentaries, schools and sub-schools. On the other hand, isolating topics from their historical context runs the risk of misrepresentation and oversimplification. An excellent survey, using either method, will be attentive to the situatedness of philosophical claims http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Indian Buddhist Philosophy by Amber D. Carpenter (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 65 (3) – Sep 3, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

Indian Buddhist Philosophy. By Amber D. Carpenter. Durham, UK: Acumen Publish- ing, 2014. Pp. v–xvii + 313. isbn 978-1-84-465298-3. Reviewed by Malcolm Keating Yale-NUS College malcolm.keating@yale-nus.edu.sg Authors generally take one of two approaches to surveying Buddhist philosophy. There is the historically oriented introduction, which charts the development from early Abhidharma to later Madhyamaka and Yogācāra. Examples of this style include David Kalupahana’s A History of Buddhist Philosophy: Continuities and Disconti- nuities (1992) and Paul Williams and Anthony Tribe’s Buddhist Thought (2000). Then there is the topic-oriented introduction, which focuses on major questions under discussion (What is suffering and how do we end it? What is the theory of no-self? How does the concept of emptiness square with the doctrine of rebirth?). Mark Gowan’s Philosophy of the Buddha: An Introduction (2003) and Mark Siderits’ Bud- dhism as Philosophy (2007) and are two instances of this approach. The risk in focusing on historical development is losing the philosophical thread in a morass of texts and commentaries, schools and sub-schools. On the other hand, isolating topics from their historical context runs the risk of misrepresentation and oversimplification. An excellent survey, using either method, will be attentive to the situatedness of philosophical claims

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 3, 2015

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