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In Praise of Blandness: Proceeding from Chinese Thought and Aesthetics (review)

In Praise of Blandness: Proceeding from Chinese Thought and Aesthetics (review) Be that as it may, in the short space that she has been allowed, Hamilton has attempted to present almost all the salient points of what in the Western view is considered Indian philosophy: from reason and belief in soteriology to the virtues of the world renouncer, from the methods of communication and polemics to the fruits of meditative disciplines; and in so doing Hamilton has successfully met the objective of the Very Short Introductions series: accessibility and stimulation. The reader will surely not be disappointed with this very short introduction to the complex world of Indian philosophy. Notes 1 ± B. K. Matilal, Perception: An Essay on Classical Indian Theories of Knowledge (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986), p. 4. 2 ± Ibid. 3 ± Ibid. 4 ± Cf. Michael Dummett, Address, delivered at All Souls College, Oxford, on June 6, 1992, on the occasion of the Commemoration of the first anniversary of the death of Professor B. K. Matilal (published by All Souls College, 1992). In Praise of Blandness: Proceeding from Chinese Thought and Aesthetics. By Francois Jullien. Translated by Paul M. Varsano. New York: Zone Books, 2004. Pp. Ë 1,969. Reviewed by Joseph Grange University of Southern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

In Praise of Blandness: Proceeding from Chinese Thought and Aesthetics (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 55 (3) – Jul 7, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1529-1898
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Abstract

Be that as it may, in the short space that she has been allowed, Hamilton has attempted to present almost all the salient points of what in the Western view is considered Indian philosophy: from reason and belief in soteriology to the virtues of the world renouncer, from the methods of communication and polemics to the fruits of meditative disciplines; and in so doing Hamilton has successfully met the objective of the Very Short Introductions series: accessibility and stimulation. The reader will surely not be disappointed with this very short introduction to the complex world of Indian philosophy. Notes 1 ± B. K. Matilal, Perception: An Essay on Classical Indian Theories of Knowledge (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986), p. 4. 2 ± Ibid. 3 ± Ibid. 4 ± Cf. Michael Dummett, Address, delivered at All Souls College, Oxford, on June 6, 1992, on the occasion of the Commemoration of the first anniversary of the death of Professor B. K. Matilal (published by All Souls College, 1992). In Praise of Blandness: Proceeding from Chinese Thought and Aesthetics. By Francois Jullien. Translated by Paul M. Varsano. New York: Zone Books, 2004. Pp. Ë 1,969. Reviewed by Joseph Grange University of Southern

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 7, 2005

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