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In Memoriam, Isidore Dyen, 1913–2008

In Memoriam, Isidore Dyen, 1913–2008 Isidore Dyen, emeritus professor of linguistics at Yale University and the undisputed doyen of Austronesian comparative linguistics from roughly the mid 1940s to the early 1970s, died on the morning of December 14, 2008, in his own bed at Evans Park senior accommodation in Newton, Massachusetts, at the age of 95. As he neared the end, he was surrounded by his son Mark, his daughter Doris, their spouses, five grandchildren, and his faithful late-life intermittent companion Margaret Sharpe, who flew to Boston from Australia when it became apparent that the time left to him was rapidly slipping away. Those who have only a casual familiarity with the history of Austronesian linguistics over the past 60 years might be tempted to say that Dyen's passing marks the end of an era, but in reality that era ended over three decades earlier.1 Isidore Dyen (Hebrew name Yitzhak, and "Iz" to his friends) was born August 16, 1913, in Philadelphia, the youngest son of Rabbi Jacob Dyen and his wife Dina (Bryzell), who were themselves immigrants from Kiev in the Ukraine. The Dyen family's home language was Yiddish, which gave the young Isidore an early exposure to a multilingual environment. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

In Memoriam, Isidore Dyen, 1913–2008

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 48 (2) – Jan 28, 2009

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

Isidore Dyen, emeritus professor of linguistics at Yale University and the undisputed doyen of Austronesian comparative linguistics from roughly the mid 1940s to the early 1970s, died on the morning of December 14, 2008, in his own bed at Evans Park senior accommodation in Newton, Massachusetts, at the age of 95. As he neared the end, he was surrounded by his son Mark, his daughter Doris, their spouses, five grandchildren, and his faithful late-life intermittent companion Margaret Sharpe, who flew to Boston from Australia when it became apparent that the time left to him was rapidly slipping away. Those who have only a casual familiarity with the history of Austronesian linguistics over the past 60 years might be tempted to say that Dyen's passing marks the end of an era, but in reality that era ended over three decades earlier.1 Isidore Dyen (Hebrew name Yitzhak, and "Iz" to his friends) was born August 16, 1913, in Philadelphia, the youngest son of Rabbi Jacob Dyen and his wife Dina (Bryzell), who were themselves immigrants from Kiev in the Ukraine. The Dyen family's home language was Yiddish, which gave the young Isidore an early exposure to a multilingual environment. The

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 28, 2009

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