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In Memoriam, Ann Chowning, 1929–2016

In Memoriam, Ann Chowning, 1929–2016 Andrew Pawley AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY Ann Chowning died in Auckland on February 25, 2016, aged 86.1 A superb ethnographer who did extensive fieldwork in four different Austronesian-speaking societies of western Melanesia, she also made important contributions to Oceanic linguistics and culture history, including substantial dictionaries of four languages and more than 20 papers, chiefly on comparative-historical topics. She also published on Mayan archaeology, prehistoric flint industries in New Britain, and folklore. Chowning's life and career as ethnographer, archaeologist, and teacher are well described in a biographical sketch (Huntsman with Chowning 2005) in her Festschrift, a volume aptly titled A polymath anthropologist: Essays in honour of Ann Chowning (Gross, Lyons, and Counts 2005). This memoir will focus on her linguistic work, while placing it in the context of her ethnographic research. Indeed, the two are hard to separate. The special value of Chowning's works on linguistic topics lies in the fact that they are informed by her encyclopedic knowledge of the ethnography and the history of research on Melanesian societies. This broad and detailed knowledge was also evident in her contributions as a very active critic and reviewer. She was quick to spot flaws in certain claims made by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

In Memoriam, Ann Chowning, 1929–2016

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 55 (2) – Dec 8, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

Andrew Pawley AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY Ann Chowning died in Auckland on February 25, 2016, aged 86.1 A superb ethnographer who did extensive fieldwork in four different Austronesian-speaking societies of western Melanesia, she also made important contributions to Oceanic linguistics and culture history, including substantial dictionaries of four languages and more than 20 papers, chiefly on comparative-historical topics. She also published on Mayan archaeology, prehistoric flint industries in New Britain, and folklore. Chowning's life and career as ethnographer, archaeologist, and teacher are well described in a biographical sketch (Huntsman with Chowning 2005) in her Festschrift, a volume aptly titled A polymath anthropologist: Essays in honour of Ann Chowning (Gross, Lyons, and Counts 2005). This memoir will focus on her linguistic work, while placing it in the context of her ethnographic research. Indeed, the two are hard to separate. The special value of Chowning's works on linguistic topics lies in the fact that they are informed by her encyclopedic knowledge of the ethnography and the history of research on Melanesian societies. This broad and detailed knowledge was also evident in her contributions as a very active critic and reviewer. She was quick to spot flaws in certain claims made by

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 8, 2016

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