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Imagining the Other: The Representation of the Papua New Guinea Subject (review)

Imagining the Other: The Representation of the Papua New Guinea Subject (review) the contemporary pacific · 20:1 (2008) to political authority. But this colonizing landscape is ambivalent: mysterious, romantic, and idyllic on the one hand; harsh and inhospitable on the other (48). Though leading white men to madness and savagery, it is also considered an ideal location for adventure, in which boys can become men (61). Four chapters then set out more colonialist discourse, now framing the PNG subject in legal terms, as "child," "savage," or "sexualized body." Here again Stella stresses the ambivalence inherent in the colonial situation. The law operates with a "discourse of contamination" to separate colonizer from indigene (97). This separation is necessary because "savagery" represents an ever-present danger to the colonizer--a danger that is not only physical but also psychological, as in the trope of the white man degenerating to the level of the native (124). The native seen as child would require nurturance, yet for decades there was no official educational policy in Papua New Guinea. Rather, education was left to the missions (106). Ambivalence continues when the native is portrayed as a sexualized body. The law had constructed New Guinean men as rapists, real or potential (140), but the females were seen as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Imagining the Other: The Representation of the Papua New Guinea Subject (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 20 (1) – Feb 11, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9464
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 20:1 (2008) to political authority. But this colonizing landscape is ambivalent: mysterious, romantic, and idyllic on the one hand; harsh and inhospitable on the other (48). Though leading white men to madness and savagery, it is also considered an ideal location for adventure, in which boys can become men (61). Four chapters then set out more colonialist discourse, now framing the PNG subject in legal terms, as "child," "savage," or "sexualized body." Here again Stella stresses the ambivalence inherent in the colonial situation. The law operates with a "discourse of contamination" to separate colonizer from indigene (97). This separation is necessary because "savagery" represents an ever-present danger to the colonizer--a danger that is not only physical but also psychological, as in the trope of the white man degenerating to the level of the native (124). The native seen as child would require nurturance, yet for decades there was no official educational policy in Papua New Guinea. Rather, education was left to the missions (106). Ambivalence continues when the native is portrayed as a sexualized body. The law had constructed New Guinean men as rapists, real or potential (140), but the females were seen as

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 11, 2007

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