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Imaging Dance: Visual Representations of Dancers and Dancing Edited by Barbara Sparti and Judy Van Zile (review)

Imaging Dance: Visual Representations of Dancers and Dancing Edited by Barbara Sparti and Judy... IMAGING DANCE: VISUAL REPRESENTATIONS OF DANCERS AND DANCING. Edited by Barbara Sparti and Judy Van Zile, with Elisie Ivanich Dunin, Nancy Heller, and Adrienne Kaeppler. Hildesheim, Germany: George Olms Verlag, 2011. 312 pp. 43 plates, 80 illustrations. 68.00. This book, on dance from around the globe and over time, begins with an evocative introduction on the differing relationship that visual imagery can have with the actual performance, pointing out that although it is commonly believed that the images record actual dance, this is not always the case. Reading this book is like wandering through an exhibit that brings together dance images from across the globe with an authoritative dance scholar at your elbow to point out where the artist follows nature or takes fanciful flight. This melding of art historical and performance practice expertise might be an evocative model for theatre scholars to follow: "Imaging Asian Theatre" might be an equally useful book. Here I will only consider the essays that deal with material that relates to Asia or the Pacific. Judy Van Zile's "Do Artists Renderings Conceal or Reveal? Images of Dance in Korea" (pp. 35­52) is both an enlightening overview of how Korean scholars have viewed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Imaging Dance: Visual Representations of Dancers and Dancing Edited by Barbara Sparti and Judy Van Zile (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 31 (1) – Apr 14, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

IMAGING DANCE: VISUAL REPRESENTATIONS OF DANCERS AND DANCING. Edited by Barbara Sparti and Judy Van Zile, with Elisie Ivanich Dunin, Nancy Heller, and Adrienne Kaeppler. Hildesheim, Germany: George Olms Verlag, 2011. 312 pp. 43 plates, 80 illustrations. 68.00. This book, on dance from around the globe and over time, begins with an evocative introduction on the differing relationship that visual imagery can have with the actual performance, pointing out that although it is commonly believed that the images record actual dance, this is not always the case. Reading this book is like wandering through an exhibit that brings together dance images from across the globe with an authoritative dance scholar at your elbow to point out where the artist follows nature or takes fanciful flight. This melding of art historical and performance practice expertise might be an evocative model for theatre scholars to follow: "Imaging Asian Theatre" might be an equally useful book. Here I will only consider the essays that deal with material that relates to Asia or the Pacific. Judy Van Zile's "Do Artists Renderings Conceal or Reveal? Images of Dance in Korea" (pp. 35­52) is both an enlightening overview of how Korean scholars have viewed

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 14, 2014

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