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Western Sufism: From the Abbasids to the New Age by Mark Sedgwick (review)

Western Sufism: From the Abbasids to the New Age by Mark Sedgwick (review) BOOK REVIEW Western Sufism: From the Abbasids to the New Age. By Mark Sedgwick. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp 350. Paper $35.00. ISBN 978-0-19- 997764-2. Reviewed by Adnan Aslan University of Notre Dame aaslan@nd.edu In the West, one might say that understanding Sufism is a difficult task. Without authentic information and deep empathy, one has to contend with only the language about Sufism. The words cut off from the Sufi practices represent a simulacrum of Sufism, not its reality. In this thoroughly researched book, Sedgwick is confident enough as a historian to start from Plotinus and end with Ian Dallas and John G. Bennett, touching almost all issues that he finds related to Sufism and visiting almost all the intellectuals whom he associates with Sufi practices in the West. The book is divided into four parts, fourteen chapters, and fifty-one sub-chapters and has a seventeen-page index of names and concepts. All illustrate the fact that he investigates every suspected Sufi like a detective. In this respect, the book is very informative. Sedgwick treats sham Sufism as real. For instance, if anyone seriously believed Sedgwick, he or she would probably end up erroneously assuming that Neoplatonism has played http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Western Sufism: From the Abbasids to the New Age by Mark Sedgwick (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 68 (3) – Aug 8, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

BOOK REVIEW Western Sufism: From the Abbasids to the New Age. By Mark Sedgwick. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp 350. Paper $35.00. ISBN 978-0-19- 997764-2. Reviewed by Adnan Aslan University of Notre Dame aaslan@nd.edu In the West, one might say that understanding Sufism is a difficult task. Without authentic information and deep empathy, one has to contend with only the language about Sufism. The words cut off from the Sufi practices represent a simulacrum of Sufism, not its reality. In this thoroughly researched book, Sedgwick is confident enough as a historian to start from Plotinus and end with Ian Dallas and John G. Bennett, touching almost all issues that he finds related to Sufism and visiting almost all the intellectuals whom he associates with Sufi practices in the West. The book is divided into four parts, fourteen chapters, and fifty-one sub-chapters and has a seventeen-page index of names and concepts. All illustrate the fact that he investigates every suspected Sufi like a detective. In this respect, the book is very informative. Sedgwick treats sham Sufism as real. For instance, if anyone seriously believed Sedgwick, he or she would probably end up erroneously assuming that Neoplatonism has played

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 8, 2018

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