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The Portraits of Madame de Pompadour: Celebrating the Femme Savante (review)

The Portraits of Madame de Pompadour: Celebrating the Femme Savante (review) 644 Biography 24.3 (Summer 2001) The broad sweep, which is the strength of Whitlock’s approach, at the same time constitutes its risks. In providing historical and cultural detail about the different settings of the texts (for example the different threshold conditions which apply to black women writing in South Africa in the 1980s and to abolitionists of the 1820s), she pays witness to her emphasis on the specificities impinging on each text. Yet she is modest in her admission that her interpretations are sketchy compared to the detailed work of specialists (145). Thus the regional specialist reader will be able to fault Whitlock on details: for example, Sindiwe Magona’s To My Children’s Children was first published in South Africa by David Philip, and not in London (147); and the researcher who would like to follow up some of the references to her excellent work would be advised to look under Judith Lu ¨tge Coullie, and not “Couille,” as misspelled throughout Whitlock’s book. This should, however, not distract from the different aims Whitlock has with her comparative approach. Although the regional specialist may not learn new details about her own little patch, she stands to gain a lot from the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

The Portraits of Madame de Pompadour: Celebrating the Femme Savante (review)

Biography , Volume 24 (3) – Jun 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

644 Biography 24.3 (Summer 2001) The broad sweep, which is the strength of Whitlock’s approach, at the same time constitutes its risks. In providing historical and cultural detail about the different settings of the texts (for example the different threshold conditions which apply to black women writing in South Africa in the 1980s and to abolitionists of the 1820s), she pays witness to her emphasis on the specificities impinging on each text. Yet she is modest in her admission that her interpretations are sketchy compared to the detailed work of specialists (145). Thus the regional specialist reader will be able to fault Whitlock on details: for example, Sindiwe Magona’s To My Children’s Children was first published in South Africa by David Philip, and not in London (147); and the researcher who would like to follow up some of the references to her excellent work would be advised to look under Judith Lu ¨tge Coullie, and not “Couille,” as misspelled throughout Whitlock’s book. This should, however, not distract from the different aims Whitlock has with her comparative approach. Although the regional specialist may not learn new details about her own little patch, she stands to gain a lot from the

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 1, 2001

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