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The Migrant Image: The Art and Politics of Documentary during Global Crisis by T. J. Demos (review)

The Migrant Image: The Art and Politics of Documentary during Global Crisis by T. J. Demos (review) Reviews 1137 of time. As Lejeune writes, “everything moves so quickly that our identity can no longer rely on the permanence of the world around us” (249). As he aptly observes, “tomorrow is already today” (250). Lejeune reminds us that although new technological forms are emerging, autobiography is not disappearing. In the last chapter of the book, Poletti and Rak interview Lauren Berlant about her blog, Supervalent Thought. Berlant discusses the episodic nature of online writing, which offers opportunities to de-prioritize narrative construc- tions of identity. While titled an interview, the text is really a conversation, with points of disagreement, clarification, and elaboration. This is a refresh- ing addition to the book because we gain insight into how academic conver- sations take place. This book would be useful in a course on new media or identity, but it still leaves some questions unanswered. There is a need to do more research on non-US constructions of online identity. There is little mention of the digital divide, yet this is another important consideration in terms of who has access to online technologies. Finally, the political economy of communica- tions technology is touched upon in some chapters but could really be further http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

The Migrant Image: The Art and Politics of Documentary during Global Crisis by T. J. Demos (review)

Biography , Volume 37 (4) – Jul 6, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Biographical Research Center
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

Reviews 1137 of time. As Lejeune writes, “everything moves so quickly that our identity can no longer rely on the permanence of the world around us” (249). As he aptly observes, “tomorrow is already today” (250). Lejeune reminds us that although new technological forms are emerging, autobiography is not disappearing. In the last chapter of the book, Poletti and Rak interview Lauren Berlant about her blog, Supervalent Thought. Berlant discusses the episodic nature of online writing, which offers opportunities to de-prioritize narrative construc- tions of identity. While titled an interview, the text is really a conversation, with points of disagreement, clarification, and elaboration. This is a refresh- ing addition to the book because we gain insight into how academic conver- sations take place. This book would be useful in a course on new media or identity, but it still leaves some questions unanswered. There is a need to do more research on non-US constructions of online identity. There is little mention of the digital divide, yet this is another important consideration in terms of who has access to online technologies. Finally, the political economy of communica- tions technology is touched upon in some chapters but could really be further

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 6, 2015

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