Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Making of Indian Diplomacy: A Critique of Eurocentrism by Deep K. Datta-Ray (review)

The Making of Indian Diplomacy: A Critique of Eurocentrism by Deep K. Datta-Ray (review) love” and its first representatives, the pivotal issue—namely, Aḥmad al- Ghazālī’s metaphysics of love—is definitely not examined as carefully and minutely as it deserves. Furthermore, as said above, the analysis of the implications of this metaphysical doctrine for the later Ṣūfī tradition (and its becoming an unalienable part of the subsequent discourse) is limited to listing the Ṣūfīs probably influenced by al-Ghazālī [in the introduction (pp. 1–8) and in the conclusion (pp. 186–187)]. Some parts of the discussion (chapters 2 and 4) are quite skilfully written and represent an important contribution to the studies of Ṣūfism and/or Islamic mysticism (although Lumbard appears to dislike that term), certain others are well intended but blurred and not adequately structured (chapter 5), and still others (chapter 3) appear to be almost superfluous and could have been significantly shortened. In short, the author has collected a great amount of important material, but sometimes he fails to arrange and present it properly—in other words, the book is appealing in terms of its content but it suffers from significant structural flaws. Last but not least, one notices that Lumbard is somewhat averse to controversial issues, whereas his chosen subject definitely is a controversial (according to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Making of Indian Diplomacy: A Critique of Eurocentrism by Deep K. Datta-Ray (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 68 (3) – Aug 8, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/i-the-making-of-indian-diplomacy-a-critique-of-eurocentrism-i-by-deep-FPXpuRlPk6
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

love” and its first representatives, the pivotal issue—namely, Aḥmad al- Ghazālī’s metaphysics of love—is definitely not examined as carefully and minutely as it deserves. Furthermore, as said above, the analysis of the implications of this metaphysical doctrine for the later Ṣūfī tradition (and its becoming an unalienable part of the subsequent discourse) is limited to listing the Ṣūfīs probably influenced by al-Ghazālī [in the introduction (pp. 1–8) and in the conclusion (pp. 186–187)]. Some parts of the discussion (chapters 2 and 4) are quite skilfully written and represent an important contribution to the studies of Ṣūfism and/or Islamic mysticism (although Lumbard appears to dislike that term), certain others are well intended but blurred and not adequately structured (chapter 5), and still others (chapter 3) appear to be almost superfluous and could have been significantly shortened. In short, the author has collected a great amount of important material, but sometimes he fails to arrange and present it properly—in other words, the book is appealing in terms of its content but it suffers from significant structural flaws. Last but not least, one notices that Lumbard is somewhat averse to controversial issues, whereas his chosen subject definitely is a controversial (according to

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 8, 2018

There are no references for this article.