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The Global Transformation of Time, 1870–1950 by Vanessa Ogle (review)

The Global Transformation of Time, 1870–1950 by Vanessa Ogle (review) Book Reviews 281 culture, notably its oppositional role in Islamic Republican Iran and the flourishing of Iranian cinema, despite state suppression and repression. Concluding the book, Foltz notes the continued importance of the celebration of Noruz, the arrival of the vernal equinox. In the first years following the 1979 Revolution, the Islamic Republican government attempted to suppress its observances, on the basis that its Zoroastrian origins made it un-Islamic. Importantly for the author, Noruz is observed across “greater” Iran, far beyond the borders of Iran, the nation-state. “But if Iran is above all an affinity [sic.]—an affective notion, rather than a political one—then borders are perhaps not what matters most” (p. 124). This returns us to the third of my original questions of where is Iran? How is it defined? How does “Iran/Iranian” shape that history? Tantalizing glimpses are offered in Iran in World History. G. R. GARTHWAITE Dartmouth College The Global Transformation of Time, 1870–1950.By VANESSA OGLE. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015. 279 pp. $39.95 (hardcover). The last five years witnessed a wave of new publications on temporality, especially—but not exclusively—in Muslim societies. Among these one can mention the volume edited by Françios Georgeon and Frédéric Hitzel, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Global Transformation of Time, 1870–1950 by Vanessa Ogle (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 28 (2) – Nov 23, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

Book Reviews 281 culture, notably its oppositional role in Islamic Republican Iran and the flourishing of Iranian cinema, despite state suppression and repression. Concluding the book, Foltz notes the continued importance of the celebration of Noruz, the arrival of the vernal equinox. In the first years following the 1979 Revolution, the Islamic Republican government attempted to suppress its observances, on the basis that its Zoroastrian origins made it un-Islamic. Importantly for the author, Noruz is observed across “greater” Iran, far beyond the borders of Iran, the nation-state. “But if Iran is above all an affinity [sic.]—an affective notion, rather than a political one—then borders are perhaps not what matters most” (p. 124). This returns us to the third of my original questions of where is Iran? How is it defined? How does “Iran/Iranian” shape that history? Tantalizing glimpses are offered in Iran in World History. G. R. GARTHWAITE Dartmouth College The Global Transformation of Time, 1870–1950.By VANESSA OGLE. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015. 279 pp. $39.95 (hardcover). The last five years witnessed a wave of new publications on temporality, especially—but not exclusively—in Muslim societies. Among these one can mention the volume edited by Françios Georgeon and Frédéric Hitzel,

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 23, 2017

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