The Ethics of Autobiography: Replacing the Subject in Modern Spain (review)

The Ethics of Autobiography: Replacing the Subject in Modern Spain (review) 938 Biography 24.4 (Fall 2001) vitae than anything else) to reflections on institutional discrimination with- in the academy (Archer), to self-indulgent self-reflection (Roth). The uneven engagement with understandings of place and space, and how these can be enhanced by understandings of their reciprocal relations with self, means that these could be the autobiographical musings of academics from almost any discipline. Monk, for example, recounts the career choice constraints faced by women geographers. Such discriminatory limitations are, unfortu- nately, standard fare in many disciplines. Moss suggests that this uneven engagement, or absence, stems from the disciplinary boundaries of geography. She notes that “perhaps autobiography inevitably brings with it notions of space and place. Perhaps space is always already present in autobiography,” and if these observations are true then “perhaps autobiography is just another avenue” to make the point “that a spa- tial understanding is fundamental to any social relation” (194). In her own reflections on the collection, Moss turns the gaps and incoherences of the fin- ished product into a possible strength. She wonders whether the sense that it does not all add up, that the contributors, in spite of their autobiographies, remain unknown, is in fact the point. Acknowledging http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

The Ethics of Autobiography: Replacing the Subject in Modern Spain (review)

Biography, Volume 24 (4) – Sep 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

938 Biography 24.4 (Fall 2001) vitae than anything else) to reflections on institutional discrimination with- in the academy (Archer), to self-indulgent self-reflection (Roth). The uneven engagement with understandings of place and space, and how these can be enhanced by understandings of their reciprocal relations with self, means that these could be the autobiographical musings of academics from almost any discipline. Monk, for example, recounts the career choice constraints faced by women geographers. Such discriminatory limitations are, unfortu- nately, standard fare in many disciplines. Moss suggests that this uneven engagement, or absence, stems from the disciplinary boundaries of geography. She notes that “perhaps autobiography inevitably brings with it notions of space and place. Perhaps space is always already present in autobiography,” and if these observations are true then “perhaps autobiography is just another avenue” to make the point “that a spa- tial understanding is fundamental to any social relation” (194). In her own reflections on the collection, Moss turns the gaps and incoherences of the fin- ished product into a possible strength. She wonders whether the sense that it does not all add up, that the contributors, in spite of their autobiographies, remain unknown, is in fact the point. Acknowledging

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 1, 2001

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