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The Bloomsbury Handbook of Chinese Philosophy Methodologies ed. by Sorhoon Tan (review)

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Chinese Philosophy Methodologies ed. by Sorhoon Tan (review) 德 as “the rhythmic systems of circulation” (pp. 159–164 passim) of qi within any existing body; altogether, these comprise the central components of yangsheng practice. Michael’s analysis of the Daodejing’s conception of de as strictly physical is astonishing but hard to refute. It is supported by many passages of the text, particu- larly those which valorize the body of an infant as manifesting the fullness of de, in startling contrast to all other ideas and images associated with de found in other early Chinese writings. The image of the infant’s de simultaneously functions to portray in like manner the physical perfection of the Sage’s body, transformed by its (re-)union with the Dao. Chapters 7, 8, and 9 continue Michael’s exploration of the Sage’s mastery of yangsheng through close textual analyses of Daodejing passages, with particular attention to cultivational sequences. This type of yangsheng reading has rarely ap- peared in print, and never with such systematic concision. The Appendix provides a full translation of the Daodejing, following the Interlocking Parallel Style first un- covered by Rudolf Wagner, but Michael’s is the first stand-alone modern IPS-based translation of the received text to appear in print. It is worthy of its own http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Chinese Philosophy Methodologies ed. by Sorhoon Tan (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 68 (2) – Apr 10, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

德 as “the rhythmic systems of circulation” (pp. 159–164 passim) of qi within any existing body; altogether, these comprise the central components of yangsheng practice. Michael’s analysis of the Daodejing’s conception of de as strictly physical is astonishing but hard to refute. It is supported by many passages of the text, particu- larly those which valorize the body of an infant as manifesting the fullness of de, in startling contrast to all other ideas and images associated with de found in other early Chinese writings. The image of the infant’s de simultaneously functions to portray in like manner the physical perfection of the Sage’s body, transformed by its (re-)union with the Dao. Chapters 7, 8, and 9 continue Michael’s exploration of the Sage’s mastery of yangsheng through close textual analyses of Daodejing passages, with particular attention to cultivational sequences. This type of yangsheng reading has rarely ap- peared in print, and never with such systematic concision. The Appendix provides a full translation of the Daodejing, following the Interlocking Parallel Style first un- covered by Rudolf Wagner, but Michael’s is the first stand-alone modern IPS-based translation of the received text to appear in print. It is worthy of its own

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 10, 2018

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