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I, the Accused

I, the Accused A B D U L L A T I E F Your Honor, the Presiding Judge, and Members of the Tribunal Experience is the master teacher, for each new experience becomes an exemplary model to be used ever after. It is through personal experience that we learn to distinguish between what is right and wrong, and to take what is wrong and make it right. For that reason, Your Honor, I wish here to relate all that I have experienced, seen, and heard during the thirteen years of my detention. It is my hope that through this judicial process my experiences might come to be fruitfully considered, and perhaps even contribute to the development of new policies. As I reveal the kinds of suffering I have endured, please don't assume that my intention is solely to discredit the authorities and enforcement officials involved. It is my feeling, rather, that law enforcement needs to consider my personal experiences of illegal treatment and the infringement of basic human rights. I know that my tale is not the first of its kind; many others have already borne similar testimony. But my testimony is a singular opportunity for me to offer additional http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

I, the Accused

Manoa , Volume 12 (1) – Apr 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A B D U L L A T I E F Your Honor, the Presiding Judge, and Members of the Tribunal Experience is the master teacher, for each new experience becomes an exemplary model to be used ever after. It is through personal experience that we learn to distinguish between what is right and wrong, and to take what is wrong and make it right. For that reason, Your Honor, I wish here to relate all that I have experienced, seen, and heard during the thirteen years of my detention. It is my hope that through this judicial process my experiences might come to be fruitfully considered, and perhaps even contribute to the development of new policies. As I reveal the kinds of suffering I have endured, please don't assume that my intention is solely to discredit the authorities and enforcement officials involved. It is my feeling, rather, that law enforcement needs to consider my personal experiences of illegal treatment and the infringement of basic human rights. I know that my tale is not the first of its kind; many others have already borne similar testimony. But my testimony is a singular opportunity for me to offer additional

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 1, 2000

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