Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Slippery Characters: Ethnic Impersonators and American Identities (review)

Slippery Characters: Ethnic Impersonators and American Identities (review) Reviews 665 and writers, as was Walt Whitman, this biography will provide the evidence and clues needed. Halleck was never completely ignored. In 1877, William Cullen Bryant introduced President Rutherford B. Hayes, who unveiled a Halleck statue in Central Park and called him “the favored of all the early American poets.” But neither Bryant, the president, nor the sculptor have sufficed to immor- talize the poet. Bayard Taylor celebrated Halleck and his love for the young doctor in “America’s first homosexual novel,” Joseph and His Friend (1870), but that novel has a long way to go before gaining the fame of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. John W. M. Hallock now offers another monument in this biogra- phy of a poet who loved men. Halleck’s greatest poetry may ultimately be in his life and his great love for Dr. Joseph Drake, which may still awaken a new generation of admirers. Charles Shively Laura Browder. Slippery Characters: Ethnic Impersonators and American Iden- tities. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 2000. 312 pp. ISBN 0-8078- 2546-8, $49.95 cloth; ISBN 0-8078-4859-X, $18.95 paper. Laura Browder begins Slippery Characters with a recent and controversial example of what she calls “ethnic impersonator autobiographies.” In Octo- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Slippery Characters: Ethnic Impersonators and American Identities (review)

Biography , Volume 24 (3) – Jun 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/i-slippery-characters-ethnic-impersonators-and-american-identities-i-xquaSh822D
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

Reviews 665 and writers, as was Walt Whitman, this biography will provide the evidence and clues needed. Halleck was never completely ignored. In 1877, William Cullen Bryant introduced President Rutherford B. Hayes, who unveiled a Halleck statue in Central Park and called him “the favored of all the early American poets.” But neither Bryant, the president, nor the sculptor have sufficed to immor- talize the poet. Bayard Taylor celebrated Halleck and his love for the young doctor in “America’s first homosexual novel,” Joseph and His Friend (1870), but that novel has a long way to go before gaining the fame of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. John W. M. Hallock now offers another monument in this biogra- phy of a poet who loved men. Halleck’s greatest poetry may ultimately be in his life and his great love for Dr. Joseph Drake, which may still awaken a new generation of admirers. Charles Shively Laura Browder. Slippery Characters: Ethnic Impersonators and American Iden- tities. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 2000. 312 pp. ISBN 0-8078- 2546-8, $49.95 cloth; ISBN 0-8078-4859-X, $18.95 paper. Laura Browder begins Slippery Characters with a recent and controversial example of what she calls “ethnic impersonator autobiographies.” In Octo-

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.